Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - U.S. History (X)

We are the Music

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Explore the music and dance sequences of 11 cultural groups who have settled in Santa Fe, New Mexico over the past 700 years. These diverse communities include the Native Americans, Spanish, Mexicans, Crypto-Jewish, Celtic, German, Greek, Japanese, Tibetan, Sikh and the Central Americans. All performers and narrators in these segments are of school-age.

Tony Bennett | Billy Joel: The Library of Congress Gershwin Prize

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Experience a musical tribute to Billy Joel in this clip featuring vocalist Tony Bennett at the annual Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. In commemoration of George and Ira Gershwin's contributions to American song and culture, the Library of Congress names an annual award to an American musican. The George and Ira Gershwin Collection is housed in the Music Division of the Library of Congress and provides a wealth of orchestrations, lyric sheets, librettos, and audio recordings.

James Hope

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Hope volunteered for the army when the Civil Way erupted in 1861. He participated in nearly a dozen battles and made sketches of what he witnessed on the battlefield. After the war, he turned his sketches into a series of large paintings that are now displayed at Antietam National Battlefield Park.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Profiles of the American West: Evelyn Cameron - How the West is Fun

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Evelyn Cameron took photographs of the American West homesteaders and the harsh life in the rugged terrain in the American Northwest, developing her signature technique of using shadows in her photographs.

Jemima Boone | Drama Based on Historical Characters

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In this video, viewers watch a scene from a play about the daughter of famous Kentucky pioneer Daniel Boone. This scene opens with Jemima recalling a date in 1773. The scene transports us to that day. Daniel and his son James are setting a trap for food.

Scottsboro Boys Stamp | History Detectives

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THE DETECTIVE: Gwen Wright.

THE PLACE: Scottsboro, Alabama.

THE CASE: What is the connection between an inconspicuous black and white stamp purchased at an outdoor market and a landmark civil rights case? “Save the Scottsboro Boys” is printed on the stamp, above nine black faces behind prison bars and two arms prying the bars apart. One arm bears the tattoo “ILD.” On the bottom of the stamp is printed “one cent.” The Scottsboro Boys were falsely accused and convicted of raping two white girls in 1931 on a train near Scottsboro, Alabama. It took several appeals, two cases before the United States Supreme Court, and nearly two decades before all nine finally walked free. History Detectives delves into civil rights history and consults with a stamp expert to discover how a tiny penny stamp could make a difference in the young men’s courageous defense effort.

Historical Photographs

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THE DETECTIVE: Elyse Luray

THE PLACE: Rapid City, South Dakota

THE CASE: History Detectives goes in search of a Native American legend. More than a hundred and twenty five years after his death, the name Crazy Horse still echoes in the black hills of South Dakota. In his life, the Lakota warrior and spiritual man vowed to protect these sacred hunting grounds from encroaching settlers and gold miners. Despite his fame, Crazy Horse refused to be photographed, shunning technology. For years rumors of Crazy Horse photographs have tantalized collectors. More than a hundred and twenty five years after the warrior’s death, History Detectives discovers if a framed image is in fact the only photographic image of this legend.

Art Research Investigation | History Detectives

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In this collection of resources from History Detectives, examine research methodology for investigating artwork, investigate a miniature painting of George Washington that may be connected to an early abolitionist, and understand connections between a collection of unusual paintings and the WPA.

Designing the Mall | The National Mall - America's Front Yard

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Learn about the evolution and design of the National Mall from its inception and explore the early considerations made by its designer, Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The design of the capitol city involved converting tidal flats, forests, and farmland into the major landmarks we see today. L’Enfant placed major landmarks on high points, placing the Capitol Building on the highest spot. Other design elements included a space for the President's house, the Washington Monument, and a grand promenade, lined with buildings and a broad canal, better known today as our National Mall.

A New Medium | In Their Own Words: Jim Henson

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Learn how Jim Henson’s childhood in rural Mississippi influenced his career and his passion for drawing and building things in this excerpt from the video In Their Own Words: Jim Henson. See how 12-year old Jim is drawn to the new medium of television and the art of ventriloquism, particularly that of Edgar Bergen.

Puppet Partnership | In Their Own Words: Jim Henson

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Explore the early years of Jim Henson and puppeteer Frank Oz’s unique creative partnership in this excerpt from In Their Own Words: Jim Henson. The puppeterring duo first met in 1960 when Oz was just 17-years old. Their pioneering work in early 1960s television, including the network variety series The Jimmy Dean Show, reveals the complexities of their relationship.

Fraggle Rock | In Their Own Words: Jim Henson

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See how "Fraggle Rock" introduced a new generation to Jim Henson's creations in this excerpt from In Their Own Words: Jim Henson. The fantasy film "Dark Crystal" was not a box-office success, but later became a cult classic. Technologically groundbreaking, Henson was disappointed with ticket sales, but he was really proud of the film as a piece of art.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bill Patrie

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Learn how Bill Patrie, a North Dakota economic developer, looks for an anchor or signature building which personifies a community, has structural integrity, and is located in a town where residents believe in the future.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they uncover the history, art and architecture that define America’s living symbol of democracy and freedom, the Capitol Building.

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