Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - High (X) - Professional (X) - U.S. History (X)

War and Space | Central Florida Roadtrip

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Like many areas in Central Florida, the nation’s involvement in war played a key role in the history of Cocoa Beach. Both Sanford and Orlando had Air Force Bases that have become their current airports. Cocoa Beach’s history revolved around man’s quest for space travel.

Barber and Mizzell Feud - Kissimmee | Central Florida Roadtrip

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Most all of us have heard of the feud between the Hattfields and the McCoys. Well, what about the Mizell-Barber family feud. Bone Mizell was the cousin of David Mizell, who was the sheriff of Orange County back in 1870. Moses Barber was a successful cattleman. This family feud was fueled in large part by post-civil war politics.

Waxhaws: Blood in the Backcountry | The Southern Campaign

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The War for American independence began well for patriots in the South.  In the city of Charles Town, South Carolina (known as “Charleston” after the war)—an unfinished palmetto fort remarkably withstood the cannon balls of the British fleet  in 1776.  Men like William Moultrie, Francis Marion, William Jasper, and others became Revolutionary War heroes. 

Four years later—the American Revolution was deadlocked.  In the North, battles were won and lost with little effect. General Henry Clinton and the British high command decided what they needed was a “Southern strategy.”

Colonel Abraham Buford was leading a regiment of Continental soldiers from Virginia to South Carolina to help defend Charleston.  A group of soldiers coming from Charleston met them on the road and told them Charleston had already fallen into the British hands. Col. Buford decided to turn the men back towards North Carolina to keep the British from advancing into South Carolina.

On May 29, 1780, Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton and the British Legion caught up with Col. Buford’s army at a place called “The Waxhaws” in the Catawba River valley,  located four miles south of the North Carolina border. Over in fifteen minutes and with 113 Americans dead on the field, this massacre became the first major battle of the Southern Campaign.

The Battle of Waxhaws was a turning point in the Revolutionary War, but not for reasons the British might have hoped.  Their intent was to make the backcountry colonists feel the “heel of the boot.”  But instead of disheartening the opposition, “Buford’s Massacre” rallied patriot support.  Many patriots who had previously surrendered rejoined the fight, determined to repay the harshness of “Tarleton’s quarter” with a vengeance of their own.

Stephanie Murphy - US Congresswoman l Vietnamese Orlando

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Vietnamese immigrant and Central Florida resident, U.S. Congresswoman Stephanie Murphy, shares the story of her path to the American dream.

A Country Preacher: Rev. De Laine

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Clarendon County, South Carolina Reverend Joseph De Laine encouraged local families to join the class action lawsuit Briggs v. Elliot, the first to challenge public school segregation. In this video segment, Joseph De Laine, Jr. and Ophelia De Laine Gona remember their father's role in the controversial school desegregation lawsuit.

Reconstruction and Black Education

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Before the Civil War, most southern states made it illegal to educate slaves, but many enslaved people did learn to read and write. During the post-Civil War Reconstruction era, the number of schools and the literacy rate for African Americans increased dramatically. This mini-documentary, produced for the American Experience: "Reconstruction" Web site, follows the development of schools for African Americans as well as the resistance it sparked.

Sheyann Webb

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Eight-year-old Sheyann Webb was among the youngest activists to demonstrate during the Civil Rights movement. In this interview, Webb recalls her decision to participate in the 1965 voting-rights march from Selma, Alabama, the resistance she encountered from her parents, and the violent force used by local officials to stop the march.

Mannahatta 1609

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from Dutch New York explores the diverse ecosystem that Henry Hudson encountered when he arrived at “Mannahatta,” the name given by the native Lenape people to the island now known as Manhattan. Dr. Eric Sanderson, Director of the Mannahatta Project, explains that Manahatta's ecosystem was more diverse than Yosemite or Yellowstone National Parks and describes the landscape, flora and fauna of the island in Henry Hudson's day.

Henry Hudson

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In 1609 when Henry Hudson, an English captain working for the Dutch, took a voyage on his ship, the Half Moon, he was seeking the most efficient route from Europe to Asia. While finding a trade route to the exotic markets of India and China was his goal, he instead discovered what would later be known as the bay of New York, the Hudson River and modern day Albany, laying the foundation for one of the most important settlements of early America.

The Healing Totem

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this New York Voices segment, the Lummi Nation of Washington State makes a gift of a commemorative totem pole for the children and families who lost loved ones at the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001. The pole symbolizes the prayers of the Lummi Nation for the healing of the families left behind. It was erected in the Sterling Forest, not far from Ground Zero (where the Twin Towers once stood).

Scandinavian Traditions | Lutefisk

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Traditional food and cooking methods is one way that North Dakotans celebrate their Scandinavian heritage and find part of their own identity in their ethnic background. “No tree grows strong by cutting off its roots.” Understanding where we come from helps us know who we are. North Dakota’s largest demographic is people of Scandinavian descent. Many people in North Dakota are aware of their roots, know who they are, and take an active role in keeping those traditions alive.

The West Virginia State Museum

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore the West Virginia State Museum and learn about the role of a museum director.

The West Virginia Division of Archives and History

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the work of an archivist and explore the types of artifacts, documents, and other methods they use to preserve West Virginia history.

Brattonsville: Choosing Sides | The Southern Campaign

Icon: 
Streaming icon

After the crushing defeat at Waxhaws, the people of the South Carolina backcountry had a decision to make.  Were they “Tories”—loyal to the crown; or would they become “Whigs” or “partisans” and fight the British invaders? 

General Thomas Sumter gathered militia troops in South Carolina. Militia units consisted of “civilian” farmers and sometimes included Catawba Indians and slaves. The American militia and partisans couldn’t just line up and take on the British. The British forces were too well-trained and disciplined. The Americans had to whittle away at the enemy, strike their supply lines—fight dozens of little battles, rather than one big battle. This strategy became known as “guerrilla warfare.”

In June 1780, the British had established an "outpost" at Rocky Mount, in the Catawba Valley. Lieutenant Colonel George Turnbull sent troops into what are now York and Chester counties to round up and eliminate the rebels. Captain Christian Huck, a loyalist from Philadelphia, was the leader.

In the community of Brattonsville, Martha Bratton sent a message to warn her husband, Colonel William Bratton, that Captain Huck was on his way. The message was delivered by Watt, the family’s African-American slave.

On July 12, 1780, the Patriot militia, led by Colonel Bratton, defeated the British Legion. This battle became known as the "Battle at Williamson's Plantation" or "Huck's Defeat."

Camden: Defeat and Destruction | The Southern Campaign

Icon: 
Streaming icon

On August 16, 1780, General Horatio Gates' army, joined by militia men from North Carolina and Virginia, marched south toward the British outpost in Camden, South Carolina. At the same time, Lt General Charles Earl Cornwallis's army headed north. The cavalries clashed in a battle that became known as the Battle of Camden, the largest battle in the South up to that point.

Pages