Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - U.S. History (X) - Economics (X)

Poverty Rates Surge in American Suburbs

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on January 13, 2014.

When President Johnson declared a "War on Poverty" fifty years ago, images of the American poor focused on the inner-city and rural poor. What is the state of American poverty today? Megan Thompson reports on the less visible but growing number of poor in America's suburbs.

205: The Westward Movement, Part I | Georgia Stories

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Georgia's economic development was quickly advanced by a gold rush during the 1830s. The first segment of this episode discusses the discovery and methods of that gold rush. The second briefly touches on the modern types of currency, but primarily focuses on the need and use of a local mint for the 1830s gold miners. The episode concludes by explaining how the gold rush led to greater demand for land in Georgia, demand that lead to multiple Native American tribes being sent on the Trail of Tears.

207: The Civil War, Part I | Georgia Stories

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The Civil War was fought as much with money and morale as it was fought with weapons. The Confederacy had so little to pay its troops that, come pay day, the soldiers would often walk away with little to no money. Added to those struggles was the Northern blockade of Savannah and the South's inability to engage in international trade. Even if the Confederacy had been able to get goods out, few would have wanted to trade with them and support the war. Many Europeans, like Fanny Kemble, actively opposed slavery and wanted it to end.

114: Rise of Modern Georgia, Part III | Georgia Stories

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This episode shows some of the different roles children have played in Georgia throughout the years. The first segment discusses the importance of children on Georgia's farms, the only type of work that is able to get around the state's child labor laws. The second segment discusses child laborers in textiles factories during the Industrial Revolution. The last segment shows a different perspective on the role of children, the founding of the Girl Scouts of America.

The Tufted Bedspread Industry | Georgia Stories

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The multi-billion dollar carpet industry of Dalton, Georgia had humble origins. In 1893, 15 year-old Catherine Evans created her first tufted bedspread. By the 1920's, the production of tufted spreads had blossomed into a "cottage industry." Cotton mills produced the raw materials, and "haulers" served as middlemen between the mills, the spread makers, and the merchants. Highway 41 became known as "Bedspread Alley" for its proliferation of merchants.

Technology & Innovation | Segment 1

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In 1931, Watson laid out expansion plans that included a research center and training/sales school. This marked one of his greatest contributions to the growth of IBM and the information technology industry.

Leadership | Segment 1

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Thomas J. Watson, Sr. was not a scientist or inventor but, through his leadership, he pushed the world of information processing into the mainstream and set the stage for the digital revolution that ultimately transformed the planet.

Diversity is Just Good Business | America by the Numbers

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Learn how increased diversity is affecting the advertising industry, in this clip from America by the Numbers. Minority populations are growing at 3-5 times the rate of the overall population, and diversity is now good business in the United States. See how this has changed since the so-called golden era of advertising—when the targeted consumer was usually white and middle class.

Rockefeller's Move to West Virginia and Program Focus

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Examine reasons behind Jay Rockefeller's move to West Virginia and programs he initiated.

Roland Fryer, Economist | MacArthur Fellows Program

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In this interview, 2011 MacArthur Fellow Roland Fryer discusses his career as an economist focusing on the causes and consequences of economic disparity due to race and inequality in American society. Through innovative investigations, Fryer has opened up a new range of topics for analysis. His research is informing the work of academics and policy makers, and he is playing an influential role in ongoing discussions about the effects of racial differences in America. This resource is part of the MacArthur Fellows Program Collection.

Rev. Frank Dukes: Selective Buying Campaign

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In 1962, Miles College student Frank Dukes helped organize andparticipated in a selective buying campaign in Birmingham, Alabama. Byboycotting downtown businesses that discriminated against them, AfricanAmericans used buying power as political leverage in the struggle forequality. In this interview, Dukes describes his role in the grassrootseffort that shook Birmingham's economy.

Unemployment Benefits in Jeopardy

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NewsHour Economics Correspondent Paul Solman explores what's behind the struggle to obtain unemployment benefits in Florida.

Maquilapolis: Examining Incentives in a Market Economy

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This clip shows Mexican women working under challenging conditions at massive factories just over the U.S.-Mexico border that are owned by some of the world's biggest corporations.

The Cadillac of Rocking Chairs | Georgia Stories

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In Marietta, returning Confederate soldier James Remley Brumby dreamed of a better future and started making flour barrels. When flour sacks replaced barrels, Brumby switched to manufacturing rocking chairs with the help of his brother Tom. The rockers are one of the oldest Georgia manufactured products still being made today. Betty Proctor Holbrook, workshop manager for Brumby Chair Company, knows customers can tell the difference as soon as they sit in a Brumby. The chair company grew to become Marietta’s largest employer.

The Candy Cane Factory | Georgia Stories

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Bob's Candies, an Albany company founded by Bob McCormack in 1919, is the largest manufacturer of striped candy in the world. McCormack was the first manufacturer to wrap his candy in cellophane. The business was successful for decades until a tornado destroyed the building in 1940. McCormack rebuilt it and his grown children helped run the business.

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