Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X) - Civics and Government (X)

Nebraska History Moments in Social Studies: Borders & Statehood

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Nebraska fun facts that are historical, arts related, science and literature based. This content falls under Nebraska State standards for Social Studies, Science, Fine Arts and Language Arts.

West Virginia | Road to Statehood

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Explore the events leading to statehood for West Virginia. The five lesson plans provide a guided viewing graphic organizer, primary source documents, maps, and activities to engage students in the study of the presidential election of 1860, the issues of the time, and individuals who played a role in the movment.

Hajj: Part III | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, Anisa Mehdi, the first American reporter allowed inside Mecca to cover the pilgrimage, follows Abdul Alim Mubarak, a television editor from Maplewood, New Jersey, during his first trek to the sacred site and his return back home to the U.S. Learn about his impressions when he first saw the Ka'bah and how the journey has impacted his life.

Eid al-Fitr

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Eid al-Fitr is the Islamic celebration that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, a time of fasting, spiritual renewal and reflection. This video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly looks at Ramadan and how American Muslims observe it in a non-Muslim culture.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln's Words

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. cites several of Lincoln's most famous lines of oratory from different points in his political career, noting the "seemingly simple but profoundly eloquent language" he used "to express and ennoble his cause."

Looking for Lincoln | Was Lincoln a White Supremacist?

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Henry Louis Gates, Jr. deconstructs the traditional, legendary narrative of Abraham Lincoln in this segment from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln. Writer Lerone Bennett, Jr. recalls his disillusionment with "The Great Emancipator" who'd been his childhood hero, citing Lincoln's proposed "compromise" solution to slavery (which had involved the deportation of slaves to colonies in Panama and Liberia) and Lincoln's failure to contribute anything to the Abolitionist cause prior to the Civil War. Historian David Blight, however, reminds us that it is our own task to define "what is worth remembering" about Lincoln's story.

Islamic Celebrations | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Muslims around the world end their month long observance of Ramadan with a celebration known as Eid Al-Fitr, the "Feast of Breaking the Fast." In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, members of the Islamic Center of Washington, DC discuss the religious and spiritual significance of these annual religious events.

Hajj: Part I | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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One of the five requirements or pillars of Islam is the pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia, also known as the Hajj. The journey is taken by thousands of Americans each year. This video on the Hajj from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly begins with a look at one American Muslim preparing for his first trip to Mecca.

Civil War Overview

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In this short history of the Civil War, we're exposed to the months leading up to November 1863, when Abraham Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address. This synopsis paints a gritty picture of the war, and of Lincoln's inspiring words that redefined the Union's fight as a battle for human equality.

Prairie Churches | Hail and Brimstone

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Listen to stories of building the South Immanuel Lutheran Church, Rothsay, Minnesota, and St. Peter and Paul Church, Strasburg, North Dakota, the latter including a significant hailstorm. Other churches in North Dakota, Minnesota and Canada are also shown.

The White House: Inside Story | The Press

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As the legend goes, the press only received access to the White House after President Theodore Roosevelt saw a group of reporters standing out in the rain…and invited them inside! In fact, journalists have always had access to the White House. But, over the years, as administrations have become wary of negative media, that access has evolved. Today, the White House Press Room, built over an old indoor swimming pool by the Nixon administration, is the center of journalism at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Each day, the White House Press Office, lead by Press Secretary Josh Earnest, briefs the press and answers questions on the goings-on of the White House and the world.

The White House: Inside Story | Part 6

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Living in the White House is a most unique experience for the families of Presidents. However, an old house will need repairs, no matter its level of national importance. Luckily, some special family members contributed to important renovations of their short-term home. Standing at the epicenter of global politics, in the heart of the nation’s capital, the story of the White House is the story of America itself.

The White House: Inside Story | Part 7

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The First Lady isn't paid for what she does, but she is in an incredible position to guide her husband and lead public initiatives from the White House. Come behind the scenes of the life of a First Lady and her staff. Standing at the epicenter of global politics, in the heart of the nation’s capital, the story of the White House is the story of America itself.

Indian Pride | Treaties and Sovereignty | Part 1

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This episode of Indian Pride examines some treaties and their impact on our country and Indian nations. JuniKae Randall interviews Melissa Zobel of the Mohegan Tribe in Connecticut, John Barret, Chairman of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation of Oklahoma, Caleen Sisk-Franko, leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe of California, and Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe of Montana.

Indian Pride, Government Structure: Part 1

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Indian government structure varies from tribe to tribe across the United States. In this segment, five different government structures are explained by:

Hollis Chough, Salt River Pima-Maricopa of Arizona

Chief Earl Old Person, chairman of the Blackfeet Nation of Montana

Mary Thomas, former governor of the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona

Johnny Jamerson, vice chair of the Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California 

Brian Vallo, director of the Sky City Cultural Center of Acoma, New Mexico

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