Social Studies

Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Social Studies (X) - High (X)

What is a tweet worth? #ALSIceBucketChallenge | PBS Idea Channel

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By now, everyone online knows about the Ice Bucket Challenge. While it has been incredibly successful in terms of dollars raised, lots of the videos failed to mention donations, and many people questioned the value of the campaign. Are these videos "slacktivism," helping only superficially with a cause? What value do our social posts really have? 

Is Google Knowledge? | PBS Idea Channel

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"Google it" seems to be the quick and easy answer for every question we could possibly ask, but is finding facts the same thing as knowing? Having billions of facts at the tips of your typing fingertips may not necessarily be making us any smarter. Some people even think it's making us stupid and lazy. Whatever way we process the vast sea of data available, the question remains: is the act of googling the same as knowledge? What the episode to find out, and tell us what you think!

Water Pollution Investigation

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Water pollution is the contamination of water resources by harmful wastes or toxins. This type of pollution can be dangerous to animals and plant populations in and around lakes, rivers, polluted groundwater areas or oceans, and can pose major problems for humans as well. Explore the detrimental effects of plastic waste pollution on the San Francisco Bay—specifically, mercury contamination, with this resource group from QUEST.

Fort Buford: Splendid Isolation | Part 5

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One of the first buildings built at the fort was the “guard house.” This was similar to a jail and was for soldiers who broke the rules. Minor offenses were punishable by hard labor, while the guard house was for perpetrators of major crimes.  The types of crimes provide a window into fort life.

Indian Police | Medicine Woman

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Joseph La Fleche recognized in 1856 that the flood of alcohol coming onto the reservation would have a terrible effect on his people. He banned liquor and even started the first Native American Police force to try to stem the flood.

History of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) | Move to Include

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The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed in 1990. The ADA has made a great impact in the lives of people with disabilities. The accommodations have increased inclusion and accessibility in the community and help everyone. At the Museum of disAbility History in Buffalo, New York we meet staff members Israel Cruz & Doug Platt to discuss the outcomes.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Indian Pride, Health: Part 2

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 Dr. Charles Grim, Director of Indian Health Services in Washington, D.C., and a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, discusses the history of the Indian Health Services department and American Indian health care, including traditional practices, diabetes, and tele-medicine.

Going to College: Inclusion in Higher Education | Move to Include

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There are college options for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. These programs connect students to the community and larger world. The continued education increases learning and skill building, social contact and better job opportunities for students. Professor Martha Mock from the University of Rochester Institute for Innovative Transition and one of the students are featured. Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Transitions to Independent Living | Move to Include

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There are options for people with intellectual disabilities to live on their own. Assisted living programs help connect adults to housing in the community and assist them in skill building to promote independence. Cori Piels describes her transition and goals for living on her own. Professor Martha Mock, Director of Institute for Innovative Transitions at the University of Rochester, discusses opportunities for people with disabilities to live independently.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Indian Pride, Health: Part 1

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JuniKae Randall introduction, discussion of health in Indian country including HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and other health care issues featuring Harold "Gus" Frank, chairman of the Forest County Potawatomi, Wisconsin; Lily Cummings, Pawnee Nation, Oklahoma; Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-ND), Senate Indian Affairs Committee; Mitchell Cypress, chairman of the Seminole Tribe, Florida; and Hollis Chough of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa, Arizona.

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

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Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Mountain Highs

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Learn how a rock climbing enthusiast turned a scenic wonder into an adventure.

Teen Advocates for a Neighborhood Park

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Meet Misra Walker, an 18-year-old who lives in a section of the South Bronx in New York City called Hunts Point. Misra explains some of the conditions her community lives with because of significant industrial activity in the area. She tells how she, along with her teen advocacy group, A.C.T.I.O.N., worked to convince the Manhattan Transit Authority (M.T.A.) to run a seasonal bus shuttle to one of the few green spaces in the community.

Adults You Know and Trust Can Help You

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Sometimes we see something on the Internet that makes us feel uncomfortable. When this happens, you need to tell an adult you trust. An adult you trust might be your mom and dad, guardian, older brother or sister, teacher, school counselor, principal, police officer, grandparent, uncle or aunt. But, even people you trust can do something that could make you feel uncomfortable. If this happens, you need to talk to another trusted adult.

In Case of Emergency, Please Dial... (How Police Train Immigrants for Emergencies)

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Not knowing local laws and emergency response procedures can be a serious problem. That’s why the Metropolitan Police Department of the City of St. Louis conducts safety meetings at the International Institute of St. Louis to help bring immigrants up to speed on local procedures, including when to dial 911. It’s also helpful for officers to establish a relationship with the community and clear up any misconceptions about police that immigrants may bring from their home countries.

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