Geometry

Geometry (X)

Two Sightings, Different Information | Cyberchase

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In this video segment from Cyberchase, the CyberSquad is trying to locate a lost Transformatron. Matt can see it along one line, while Jackie says she can see it along a different line. Digit and Inez try to figure out how this is possible.

Formulas for Circle Area and Circumference: Simple as Pie

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In this video from Cyberchase, Bianca and her friend team up to sell pies. Bianca learns that pie-pan sizes are the measured diameter of the pan, but that there is a mathematical relationship between the diameter of the pan and the circumference of the pan. In the accompanying classroom activity, students calculate the circumference of a variety of wheels. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

Scale City | Scale Models in the Real World

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This video explores scale models, including 1:12 dollhouse models, 1:24 railroad models, and 1:192 architectural models. It explains what the different ratios represent and asks students to consider how they can use measurement and proportional reasoning to create their own scale models. The accompanying classroom activity gives students hands-on practice with creating models to scale and with real-world measurement. This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School Collection.

Volume of Shapes Composed of Right Rectangular Prisms

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Use unit cubes to determine the volume of an irregular 3D figure. This video focuses on breaking a complex figure up into two rectangular prisms and then finding the volume of the parts before adding them together to get the whole figure. This video was submitted through the Innovation Math Challenge, a contest open to professional and nonprofessional producers.

Classifying Quadrilaterals

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In this video, examine strategies to identify the properties of quadrilaterals—specifically, parallelograms. Students will compare and contrast squares, rectangles, and rhombuses, which are all parallelograms. In the accompanying classroom activity, students create posters identifying the properties of various quadrilaterals. They explore how these shapes compare and contrast and then analyze the ways that parallelograms distinguish themselves from other quadrilaterals.

Volume of a Rectangular Prism Word Problem: Marbles in a Fish Tank

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Learn how to find the volume of a rectangular prism through a word problem.

Area of a Triangle: Musically Interpreted

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Watch and listen to how to find the area of a triangle set to hip-hop music. This video focuses on calculating the area of triangles, and explains why the equation works. This video was submitted through the Innovation Math Challenge, a contest open to professional and nonprofessional producers.

The Belly Buster Pizza Puzzle

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Doubling something isn't always easy! See if you can figure out why if Tito sells his new pizza for $19.99 he'll be in trouble. Use what you know about area, rates, and proportions to figure out how much Tito should charge or what the dimensions of the new pizza should be in this real world application of math.

Wall of Fire: Tetrahedron

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Watch as the "Wall of Fire" in the National Museum of Mathematics shows the relationship between two and three-dimensional figures. This video focuses on the 2D cross sections that can be observed when a laser projects through a 3D tetrahedron. This video was submitted through the Innovation Math Challenge, a contest open to professional and nonprofessional producers.

Is It Square?

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See three techniques for determining whether a rectangle truly has square corners. Learn more about construction technologies in this animation from Design Squad Nation.

Do an Hour of Code | Tynker

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Build the computer literacy and problem solving skills students need to become innovators of the future. 

Introduce students to computer programming, or take their coding skills to the next level as they engage in fun activities and projects that enhance STEM learning outcomes. With an Hour of Code with Tynker, teachers can easily introduce the basics of computer programming in a fun and intuitive way.  Start with any of the six adventure puzzles, then students can apply what they’ve learned to create fun projects to share with others – multi-level and multi-player games, math patterns, interactive comics and greeting cards. 

No programming experience is required.  Use the resources provided to quickly plan a successful Hour of Code for your class. Students can access Candy Quest and Dragon Dash puzzles from this site.  The rest of the activities, plus a teacher's guide and answer keys, can be found at hourofcode.tynker.com.

Volume of Right Rectangular Prisms

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Learn to use unit cubes to model the formula for volume of a right rectangular prism with fractional edge lengths in this video from KCPT. In the accompanying classroom activity, students watch the video and then use unit cubes to determine the volume of a container, rounding dimensions to the nearest half unit. To get the most from the activity, students should have experience finding the volume of right rectangular prisms with whole-number sides by packing with and counting unit cubes and by using the formula l • w • h.

Real-Life Math | Dentist

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In this video, a dentist explains the importance of understanding mathematics in his profession. He uses math for converting numbers, calculating doses of anesthetics, measuring teeth for root canals, and maintaining a budget. In the accompanying activity, learners will practice their own metric conversions and data analysis as they measure their heights and arm spans in order to find appropriately sized bicycles.

This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School collection. 

Real-Life Math | Civil Engineer

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Civil engineer Melissa Sikes explains how she uses math in her work on water and wastewater projects in this video from KAET. In the accompanying classroom activity, students solve a problem that Ms. Sikes poses in the video: finding the diameter of a cylindrical reservoir of a given volume and height. They then construct a cylindrical object to meet volume specifications. To get the most from this lesson, students should be familiar with the formula for finding the volume of a cylinder.

This resource is part of the Math at the Core: Middle School collection.

The Math of the Winter Olympic Games | Things Explained: Angles

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In this episode of Things Explained, we take a look at Winter Olympic sports from a different angle and see how geometry plays an important role in bringing home the gold.

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