Social Studies

Science (X) - Social Studies (X) - Geography (X)

Witnessing Environmental Changes

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This video segment examines the issue of climate change from the perspective of Native Americans. Elders describe the changes they have observed in their surroundings, especially those related to water, and the effects they are having on their way of life. Dr. Daniel Wildcat explains that because Native people are so deeply connected to the land, non-Native people should consult with Native people about what we are experiencing. The video segment was adapted from a student video produced at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas.

A Visit to Yellowstone

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Geothermal features, which include geysers, hot springs, steam vents called fumaroles, and boiling mud pots, are found on nearly every continent. Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming contains the world's largest collection: nearly 10,000 such features lie within its 2.25 million acres. In this video segment adapted from ZOOM, a young guide offers viewers a tour of the park and explains how Earth's internal heat fuels geothermal formations. The tour makes it clear why millions of people visit Yellowstone each year to witness the park's explosive displays and colorful deposits.

Using a Compass to Find Your Way

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Navigation is the act of accurately locating one's position on land, at sea, or in the air. Orienteering, the recreational sport featured in this video segment from ZOOM, tests one's ability to successfully navigate a course using a compass and a map. Learn more about orienteering's rules, how to use a compass, and how courses are set up by viewing the video.

The Hunting Dogs of Papua New Guinea

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This video from Nature describes the history and uses of the dogs of Papua New Guinea. Men from the Akepangi tribe set out to hunt at dawn. They believe the dogs they take with them have supernatural abilities to track down prey. The dogs are called the singing dogs because they howl but do not bark. In the hunt, the dogs find an opossum in the canopy (upper layer of vegetation). The dogs are more valuable to the hunters than their bows and arrows. The tribe believes the dogs tell them where the evil spirits lie in the jungle.

Settlement and Deforestation | Children of the Amazon: Part 7

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Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home by an outside world. From Chief Amir Surui’s embattled efforts to stop illegal loggers to the assassination of legendary rubber tapper Chico Mendes, this poetic and visually stunning film engages our senses and sympathies as global issues take on a profound human perspective.

An Ancient Legend Teaches Climate Change Adaptation

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Today's unsustainable use of natural resources is compared to the legend of the giant Uab. Uab, a boy who grew into a giant as he ate everything around him, became so heavy that the island he lived on began to sink. His appetite caused other problems, including a change in weather patterns and damage to coral reefs. Left with no choice, the islanders eventually killed Uab. This legend mirrors what is happening today globally and in the Pacific Island region: the unsustainable use of land, marine, and freshwater resources is having unwanted effects. In response, Palau is taking steps to help conserve natural resources for future generations.

Antarctica | Jonathan Bird's Blue World

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Jonathan treks all the way to Antarctica to investigate life south of the polar circle. Along the way, he dives in the majestic kelp forests of Patagonia, swims with penguins, dives under an iceberg, meets a massive jellyfish, and has an incredible encounter with a leopard seal -- the apex predator of Antarctica. The accompanying lesson plan reviews the pelagic, benthic, and sea ice realms of the Southern Ocean.

Uganda: Sustainable Tourism | Introduction

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Learn about 6-year CITA project in Uganda on enhancing rural livelihoods with sustainable tourism. Project Director, Dr. Campbell talks about the importance of preserving wildlife.

Shipping on the Great Lakes: Benefits and Consequences of Exporting Goods

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Learn how Lake Michigan is used for the shipping and exporting of goods. Lake Michigan is 118 miles at its widest point, 301 miles long and is the third largest Great Lake by surface area. Today Lake Michigan continues to be a major shipping route to and from the Midwest for freighters. 

The town of Singapore, founded in the 1830’s, was one of the first establishments on the Michigan side of Lake Michigan. This town started as an entrepreneurial town to rival Chicago or Milwaukee as a lake port. It quickly became known as a busy lumbering and timbering town.

White pine lumber was in great demand all over the Midwest until October of 1871. A couple of days after the Great Chicago Fire, a big forest fire burned the western side of Michigan near Singapore and depleted the timber supply. Singapore went bankrupt because of the weakened timber supply and became a ghost town.

With Singapore becoming a ghost town and no longer a Lake Michigan shipping port, timber and leather had to find a way to be shipped to Chicago and the Midwest. The town of Saugatuck became the nearest port on the Michigan side of Lake Michigan to ship goods across Lake Michigan to Chicago and the Midwest. 

With the decline of the timber industry, due to the forest fire, fruit farming was gaining popularity. Boats were needed to ship fresh fruit and leather across Lake Michigan.

With Lake Michigan becoming a major shipping route, this led to a decline in the fishing industry. 

The opening of the Welland Canal connecting the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, had positive and negative effects on the ecosystems of Lake Michigan. 

South Carolina Geography | The Coastal Zone

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The Coastal Zone is the region of the state where creeks and rivers are affected by the ebb and flow of ocean tides. (In some places, such as Virginia, the term "tidewater" is used to describe this region.) Counties in South Carolina that are wholly or partially located in the Coastal Zone are Horry, Georgetown, Colleton, Jasper, and Beaufort.

 

Built on Agriculture - Selkirk Settlers | Red River Land

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The first settlers came mostly to the area called Forks in Winnipeg, where the Red and Assiniboine Rivers come together. Glacial Lake Agassiz retreated, leaving fertile soils in the Red River Valley, which was good for agriculture.

Virtual Field Trip Video: Coastal Peru | Nature Works Everywhere

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Join fisheries scientist Matias Caillaux from The Nature Conservancy to explore the Humboldt Current Ecosystem off the coast of Peru while learning about the area’s amazing diversity and productivity. While Peru is most frequently recognized for its rainforests, mountains, and ancient Inca civilizations, it is also home to one of the most productive ocean ecosystems. 

Find a teacher's guide here to accompany this field trip.

Mining and the Environment | Wild Nevada

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Will mining ever become obsolete? What are some benefits of mining to the state of Nevada?  Learn some of the Pros and Cons of mining in Nevada as told to Wild Nevada by Sean Pitts, Director of the East Ely Railroad Depot Museum. Nevada’s fourth graders are expected to understand the industries in Nevada that impact them. Mining is an important industry in Nevada. However, there are controversial issues concerning mining that are important to explore, analyze, and discuss. Students will have a better understanding of the effects of mining in Nevada both economically and environmentally.

Rare Nebraska Featuring the Indian Caves State Park

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As a companion to NET’s The PlainStory podcast, NET has produced a set of immersive, experiential videos designed to give viewers a taste of rare Nebraskan habitats via 360 video and audio. We recommend viewing these using the Chrome browser and using headphones to get the full audio effect. We also recommend checking out The PlainStory podcast at plainstorypodcast.org, or wherever great podcasts are downloaded.

Pineview Reservoir and Dam | Images of Utah

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Learn about the operations of Utah's Pineview Reservoir and dam. This video is extracted from the 22-part video series The Geography of Utah, conceived and written by Albert L. Fisher, PhD of the University of Utah. The series encompasses the political, cultural, historical and sociological geography of the state of Utah. It describes the activities, the land, and the people. Much of the video material was videotaped on location throughout the state of Utah, giving the student and interested viewer valuable field trip experiences.

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