Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - High (X) - U.S. History (X)

Goin' to Boston | Kentucky/Appalachian Culture

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Goin’ to Boston is a traditional folk dance enjoyed as a “play party game” in Appalachia. Instructor Anndrena Belcher teaches a group of middle school students the song and dance moves. She explains what a “play party game” is and teaches such commonly used folk dance movements as promenade, sashay, reel, and casting the lines.

About the Lancers Quadrille | The Civil War Era

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In this video, dance and music educator Jennifer Rose explains the history of The Lancers Quadrille, including the origin of the dance and why it was popular in Civil War-era America. She also discusses the movements and sets of the dance.

Lubin Photos | History Detectives

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History Detectives examines century old photos that may have captured the dawn of American movie-making--nearly 3000 miles from Hollywood. One of the books holds many Western scenes, including a cowboy character captioned, "Herbert Lubin." Other captions refer to the Siegmund Lubin Studios. Who was Siegmund Lubin? And was Herbie Lubin a movie star? History Detective Tukufu Zuberi goes on an excursion through an early movie mogul’s dramatic rise and fall.

Indian Pride: Myths and Real Truths | Part 4

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JuniKae Randall introduces Lefty's Little Steppers, dance group from the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians in North Dakota, demonstrate their craft.

Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota | Flandrau State Park

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One of the most unusual designs build by Civilian Conservation Corps, is at Flandrau State Park, Minnesota.

Camp Washington Carver

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Explore the rich history and present day activities related to Camp Washington Carver

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Crosby

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A large commercial building in Crosby, used primarily as a retail store, has been renovated for use as apartments, a hotel room, coffee shop, and other business space with minimal expense.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Grand Forks

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Like many cities, Grand Forks had seen a decline in activity and economic development in its downtown area during the 1960s and 1970s which was escalated by the devastating flood of 1997. Federal assistance and local restoration projects have revitalized the area by rehabilitating the buildings that could be saved.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Revitalizing Downtowns

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Many rural communities are struggling to preserve their downtowns, their economy and their identity, which can be helped by revitalizing historical buildings.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bowman

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To help the community of Bowman survive, keep business at home, and provide jobs, the town has morphed a grocery store into the library and a lumberyard into a museum.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Minnesota Legacy Short | Paul Olson: Sculptor

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Learn about Minneapolis sculptor Paul Olson who started out in life never intending to be an artist of any kind. But once he found his passion, sculpting became a way of life. Paul regularly makes and sells installations to Twin Cities businesses. The Concordia College of Moorhead graduate let us follow his process and find out what drives him.

Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | The Apprenticeship in Japan

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Richard Bresnahan, Master Potter, talks about his pottery apprenticeship in Japan. He explains "tsuchi-aji," which means "the taste of the clay." It is metaphor for a spiritual element of Japanese pottery making.

Richard Bresnahan: The Taste of the Clay | Sustainability and Community Involvement

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Learn how a sense of community emerges during a firing of the massive Johanna kiln.

Introduction | In Their Own Words: Jim Henson

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Explore the creation of Kermit the Frog and the highlights of Muppet creator Jim Henson’s life and career in this video from In Their Own Words: Jim Henson. Henson's determination to be more than a children’s entertainer led to his foray into moviemaking and the enduring characters he created. The blockbuster premiere of “The Muppet Show” in 1976 brought Henson's dream of prime time Muppet success, a dream that began in the early years of television.

Steamboat Jimmy

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Learn about James Rumsey, the first man to invent the steam powered boat, and the challenges he faced when he demonstrated it for a crowd of people.

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