Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - Economics (X)

Jittery Joe's | Fast Forward

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Jittery Joe's is a rapidly growing coffee chain based in Athens. And we get to explore their world with a peek into the fast-growing field of food science. We interview Roaster Master Charlie Mustard, learning the intricacies of what goes into making a great cup of "joe." It turns out there’s a lot of math and science behind it. So Teachable Moments focus on where coffee is grown, how huge this industry really is, and exactly how caffeine affects the body.

Georgia Olive Farms | Fast Forward

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It’s a little known fact that Georgia farms grew olives back in the 1800’s. But it’s becoming a much better known fact that this crop is making a comeback. Thanks to people like State Representative and farmer Jason Shaw, we learn why our state’s climate is so hospitable to the olive, creating a whole new industry. And while we’re visiting the southern side of the state, we take a ride on the Georgia Grown Trail to learn a little about agritourism.

Georgia Ports Authority | Fast Forward

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A trip to any mall will give you a look at thousands of items that weren’t created down the street. Many of them were imported from distant lands. And the Georgia Ports Authority in Savannah…the 4th largest port in the country…is the point of entry for, quite literally, tons of them. The Georgia Ports Authority has a job for just about any interest. They’re governed by logistics and driven by technology—technology that you might be able to learn by…playing video games? You’ll want to see this.

Which Comes First, Hydrogen-Powered Cars or the Fueling Stations?

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Learn about the cars of tomorrow and hydrogen power with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 21, 2014. After spending more than a decade and billions of dollars on developing zero-emission hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, carmakers are planning to release their models in California. But despite the state’s large demand for cars and tough air quality standards, California lacks a network of fueling stations.

Family Sweet-Potato Farm | America's Heartland

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Modern farming is a complex industrial coordination of crop yields, processing, packing, shipping, and food-safety certification. Travel to Matthews Ridgeview Farms in Wynne, Arkansas, where 21st-century complexity is built on basic principles of quality product and family heritage.

Old Red Trail | Construction Changes

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Early road construction was time-consuming and expensive.  In 1959, road crews could lay out one mile of road a day at best. With today’s technology and equipment, paving and grading roads is much easier and faster.  Construction of bridges required specialists who could design the river-spanning lengths.  In the 1960s, road construction cost $400,000 per mile of four-lane highway, including the cost of land, equipment, workers’ pay, bridges, and materials.  Today, roads cost more than four times that for two lanes in one direction, but they last 50% longer

America Revealed | Clear Skies

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Support your History, Geography, and Science curriculum with this video which takes a close look at how policy and technology improvements in the planning and procedure of air traffic control systems can guide the future of air transportation. Then, use the accompanying lesson plan, "Crowded Skies: Imagining the Future of Air Transportation," to have students write proposals for improving the state of transportation in the United States.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Nascar Goes Green

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Discover how NASCAR has joined the environmental initiative and lowered their energy consumption. Analyze the cost and benefits of companies which have joined the green initiative. Teachers can use the accompanying lesson plan, "A Piece of the Energy Pie: Evaluating Incentives for Going Green," to have students conduct a cost-benefit analysis of green businesses.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Engineering the Jet Age

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Trace the emergence of the passenger jet from its military origins and learn about the obstacles and opportunities that Boeing’s president Bill Allen faced taking the company into the jet age, in this video from WGBH and The Documentary Group. After World War II, Boeing relied on sales of the B-47 bomber to keep the company afloat. This plane, which flew nearly 600 miles per hour at 35,000 feet, inspired Allen to conceive of a future in which commercial airline passengers would fly in jets. A decade after the close of World War II, Boeing delivered the 707. Within a year, more travelers were crossing the Atlantic by air than by sea. This resource is part of the Aerospace Engineering Collection.

Solar Energy Debate in Nevada Heats Up | PBS NewsHour

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Hear why solar energy has become a hot topic in sunny Nevada with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 27, 2016.

Generation West Virginia | Appalachian Innovators

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Learn about a program based in Huntington, West Virginia that is providing good paying jobs and encouraging community service at the same time.

Generation Like: You Are What You "Like"

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Learn about the evolution of digital media from an industry that sought out teens to one in which teens seek out content to “like” in this video from FRONTLINE: Generation Like. As school-aged children spend more time in digital spaces, companies are able to use information that they gather from their activities. This is different from how it once was. In 2001, corporations chased kids down and tried to sell cool teen culture back to them. Today, teens tell the world what they think is cool using the social currency of their generation: likes, follows, friends, and retweets. When kids like something online, it becomes part of the identity that they broadcast to the world. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

What's the Value of a Life? | Braincraft

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How do scientists—and doctors—measure the value of a life?

How Widespread Is Student Homelessness? | Above the Noise

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Student homelessness in the US is a tricky thing to quantify. HUD -- the federal government's Department of Housing and Urban Development -- controls most of the money used to help the homeless. But, that agency misses about 4 in 5 homeless students. Why? It’s all about how you define the term “homeless”. According to HUD, you’re only considered homeless if you’re living in a shelter or living on the streets. But according to the Department of Education, about 80% of the 1.3 million homeless students living in the US are couch surfing, living in motels, or doubling up with family or friends. These students aren’t eligible for HUD money, so increasingly, it’s up to schools to provide help. Host Myles Bess explores how homeless students get the help they need when different federal agencies use competing definitions to define who’s homeless.

Heidi Williams, Economist | MacArthur Fellows Program

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In this interview, 2015 MacArthur Fellow Heidi Williams explains her interest in innovation in health care and the unexpected role that patent regulation plays in scientific research. Williams’s work combines empirical observations and custom-designed data collection methods that offer new insights on technological changes in health care. Her creative approach and interdisciplinary understanding of regulatory law, biological science, and medical research, have allowed Williams to trace the interplay between institutions, market behavior, and public policy. This resource is part of the MacArthur Fellows Program Collection.

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