Health/Phys. Ed.

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Ebola Outbreak in Africa Claims Nearly 900 Lives

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Four African nations are fighting to contain the largest outbreak in history of Ebola, a virus with no cure. Update your students with the latest on the health crisis with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from August 5th, 2014.

‘California Thursdays’ Source School Lunches

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Teach your students about sustainable school lunches with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from September 15, 2014.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

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Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

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Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Cancer - A New Treatment

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This video segment adapted from Curious presents the journey of Mark Davis.  In high school, Mark Davis ran the 400 in track.  His goal was to have the best time for this event in the United States.  In college, his aspirations changed.  He decided to study chemical engineering because it was the most challenging major.  After college, he began research at Cal Tech, where he solved problems thought to be unsolvable.  When his wife contracted breast cancer, she posed a new challenge for him.  She asked him to find an effective cancer treatment that would not make patients terribly sick.  With no background in cancer research, he took on the challenge and was successful.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

Roadtrip Nation Leaders: Bilal Bomani

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Bilal never realized he would pursue a career in math until a teacher pointed out the connection between numbers and music. Starting from his love of music, Bilal went on an educational journey that led him to his current work as a research scientist for NASA.

 

Use the Support Materials to access the lesson plan and student worksheet. 

Interested in more leaders? Check out Roadtrip Nation's Interview Archive for more engaging conversations about finding your road. 

Which Animal Started the Ebola Outbreak?

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Find out how scientists are trying to trace the animal origin of Ebola with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 4, 2015.

Overcoming Mental Illness in Pakistan

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Find out why Pakistan struggles to treat mental illness with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 17, 2015.

Giving Traumatized Kids a Head Start in Healing

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A quarter of children experience a traumatic event before kindergarten, but an inspiring new program is leading the way to help them heal. Share the story with your students with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from July 25, 2014.

Fantasy Sports: Gambling or Skill-Based Fun? | PBS NewsHour

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Find out the controversy behind online fantasy sports with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from February 4, 2016.

Reports Reveal Coca-Cola Funded Pediatric Association and Child Obesity Research

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Learn why the American Academy of Pediatrics severed its ties with Coca-Cola with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 30, 2015.

How Gold Star Families Became a Political Issue | PBS NewsHour

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For the sake of time, we recommend stopping the video at 3m:23s.

President Donald Trump continues to face criticism for a condolence call to the Gold Star family of Sgt. La David Johnson, a Special Forces soldier recently killed in Niger. Gold Star Families are the relatives of US military members who died in battle. There was a time when a political leader would never politicize the death of a service member or question a grieving family, said Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report. “It’s a little bit like the customer’s always right. Right? The grieving family is always right in this case,” she said. Walter added this was no longer the case after Trump criticized the Khan family, a Gold Star family, after they spoke out against him at the Democratic National Convention.

October 25, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

How Widespread Is Student Homelessness? | Above the Noise

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Student homelessness in the US is a tricky thing to quantify. HUD -- the federal government's Department of Housing and Urban Development -- controls most of the money used to help the homeless. But, that agency misses about 4 in 5 homeless students. Why? It’s all about how you define the term “homeless”. According to HUD, you’re only considered homeless if you’re living in a shelter or living on the streets. But according to the Department of Education, about 80% of the 1.3 million homeless students living in the US are couch surfing, living in motels, or doubling up with family or friends. These students aren’t eligible for HUD money, so increasingly, it’s up to schools to provide help. Host Myles Bess explores how homeless students get the help they need when different federal agencies use competing definitions to define who’s homeless.

Should Sexting Be a Crime? | Above the Noise

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Numerous research surveys and school scandals indicate that teens are engaging in sexting, and as technology and trends rapidly change, it’s hard for parents, schools and the law to create rules around this behavior. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to help students discuss the tricky issue of sexting.

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