Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - WNET (X) - U.S. History (X)

Charles Hamilton Houston and His Legal Challenge Against Jim Crow

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow begins by discussing Walter White’s struggle for an anti-lynching bill in the 1930s. Ultimately, White’s hopes for legislation were shattered but Charles Hamilton Houston, chief legal council for the NAACP, believed the Constitution already mandated civil rights—all the NAACP needed was to take the fight to the courts. Houston designed a system of gathering court cases that would challenge Jim Crow era policies and set precedent. Houston’s efforts would eventually lead to the civil rights milestone Brown v. Board of Education.

Charlotte Hawkins Brown

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In 1902, during the worst years of Jim Crow segregation, Charlotte Hawkins Brown founded the Palmer Memorial Institute in North Carolina. This segment from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow shows how, despite pressures to give African American youth only an industrial education, Brown fought the system and strived to provide her students with the best academic education available.

African American History Since the Civil Rights Movement | The African Americans

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this media gallery, you will find a series of videos from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross that examines the major movements and turning points in African American history from 1968 to the present, including the Black Panthers and the Black Power movement, Afrocentricity in culture, the rise of the black middle class, the development of hip hop culture, the effects of the War on Drugs, and the election of Barack Obama. As you view the videos, consider the legacy of the civil rights movement, the tensions that emerged from the progress made, and how they reshaped the African American experience.

Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? and The Forgotten Man

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This enhanced video resource takes a look at the Great Depression, focusing on Yip Harburg’s song "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" and President Roosevelt’s famous "Forgotten Man" speech. The video segment provides background and context for the song, while the background essay examines specific elements of Roosevelt’s speech, focusing on his consistent allusion to and use of war metaphors. Ultimately, the resource helps connect the song to the speech, demonstrating the negative sentiment to President Hoover and the United States’ need for change following the devastation of the Great Depression.

 

Microaggressions in the Classroom

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Think about a time when someone said something about your identity that made you feel insulted or slighted. Even if they didn’t intend it you probably experienced a microaggression. Learn how to respond to microaggressions in your classroom with this video from the University of North Texas. In the accompanying classroom activity, participants reflect on their experiences with microaggressions. Additional support materials are available including a background essay and vocabulary. These videos are excerpted from the full Microaggressions in the Classroom video with the generous permission of producer Dr. Yolanda Flores Niemann.

Life After Emancipation Proclamation Great Migration | The African Americans

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross describes the continued oppression of African Americans following the Emancipation Proclamation.

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow | Isaiah Montgomery Founds Mound Bayou

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow looks at Isaiah T. Montgomery, the political leader and businessman who in 1887 founded the African American community of Mound Bayou, along the Mississippi Delta. Residents cleared the land and developed a thriving city along the frontier. By the late 1800s, Mound Bayou was a successful community and a safe haven for southern blacks. In 1890, Montgomery became a key figure in a brewing controversy when, in an effort to protect Mound Bayou from white intervention, he agreed to vote at the Mississippi Constitutional Convention for an amendment that would ensure the legal disenfranchisement of blacks in the state.

Lucy Laney

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow addresses the life and impact of Lucy Laney, the founder of the Haines Normal and Industrial School in Augusta, Georgia. Laney was an influential Jim Crow-era educator. She believed it was essential to cultivate the minds of her students in order to develop intellectual leaders for the future, especially black women who could then teach the next generation.

Wilmington: A Peaceful City Turned Violent

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow examines the factors that lead to violent and irreparable change in Wilmington, North Carolina. In the years following the Civil War, Wilmington, with a prosperous and growing African-American middle class, was a city that exemplified peaceful co-existence between the races. But in the 1898 election, when the white-dominated Democratic party regained power throughout the state, blacks in Wilmington not only lost their civil rights, but also were victims of a terrible massacre staged by angry white mobs.

Ella Baker and the SNCC | The African Americans

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross tells the story of Ella Baker, the unsung hero of the civil rights movement who founded the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in 1960.

 

Microassaults, Microinsults, and Microinvalidations

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the different types of microaggressions with this video from the University of North Texas. Use the accompanying handout to further explore how microaggressions impact different minority groups. Additional support materials are available including vocabulary. These videos are excerpted from Microaggressions in the Classroom with the generous permission of producer Dr. Yolanda Flores Niemann.

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow | Ned Cobb: Fighting for the Farmer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In 1931, the Communist Party traveled to the South to fight racial segregation and unfair practices associated with sharecropping. Ned Cobb, an African American farmer, not only welcomed their presence, he also became president of the Sharecroppers Union to fight for the rights of poor black and white farmers. This video shows how Cobb paid the price in his fight for equality.

The Atlanta Riot

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Although a prosperous African-American middle class had emerged in Atlanta by the early 1900s, it was understood by both whites and blacks that Atlanta was a tense and highly segregated city. In 1906, on the heels of the Thomas Dixon play The Clansmen, newspapers began falsely reporting assaults of white women by black men, leading to the Atlanta Riot. This segment from The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow describes the events leading up to the riot, and its impact on the black civil rights leaders Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois and Walter White.

Forty Acres and a Mule | The African Americans

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross explains the origins of the phrase “forty acres and a mule” and what became of this idea.

Walter White: Reporting the Crime

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from the The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow presents experiences from the life of Walter White. This unsung hero was an African American man who put his life in danger passing for a white man while working as the chief investigator of the crime of lynching for the N.A.A.C.P. White was successful on countless occasions in documenting crimes and even collecting and publishing the names of perpetrators.

Pages