Social Studies

ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X)

Indian American Comedian Discusses Humor and Race

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Explore how one comedian uses humor as a strategy to discuss race with this PBS NewsHour video and educational materials from July 31, 2014. In an interview with Hari Sreenivasan, comedian Hari Kondabolu discusses how he uses humor to tackle the topics of racism and colonialism in his standup act.

Current Events in Ferguson: The Michael Brown Shooting

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Use these videos and handouts from PBS Newshour Extra to address the civil unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting of an unarmed teenager. These news stories span from August 12, 2014, through November 24, 2014.

The incident began when officer Darren Wilson stopped Michael Brown, a 17-year-old student, on Aug. 9, 2014. There are differing accounts of what happened next, but eyewitnesses say that Brown had his hands in the air and was surrendering to police when Wilson shot him six times. The event sparked racial tension in Ferguson, a town where the majority population is black and most police officers are white, and set off protests nationwide. The incident has also raised questions about the role of police in a community and during protests.

Obama Convenes Meeting with Congressional Leader to Discuss Shutdown

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Help students understand the government shutdown with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resources from October 3, 2013. 

Anger and Unrest in Missouri After Police Kill Unarmed Teenager

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Update your students on the police shooting that took place in Ferguson, Missouri, with this video and educational materials from PBS NewsHour from August 11, 2014.

Why We Still Need Freedom Schools, 50 Years Later

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Update your students on the work that Freedom Schools are doing with this video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Candidates Cite Security Qualifications after Weekend Attacks | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Find out how the candidates responded to suspected terror attacks with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 19, 2016.

Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise | You Are Enough

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Examine the Maya Angelou’s impact on those who knew her personally in this video from American Masters | Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise. Utilizing video, discussion questions and teaching tips, students analyze and reflect on Angelou’s mentors in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.

How Monticello’s Exhibit on Sally Hemings Deepens Our Understanding of U.S. History | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Read the summary below, first. Then watch the video and answer the discussion questions found in support materials below. Follow along using the transcript.

Summary:

Visitors have long come to Monticello (mon-teh-CHELL-oh, like the instrument) to see and admire Thomas Jefferson’s mansion, but a new silhouette and exhibition bring a largely hidden life into the open. No portrait exists of Sally Hemings, an enslaved woman who had a decades-long relationship with Jefferson and bore him six children, but the public can now learn more about her story.

August 6, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Finding Their Voice

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In the 1920s, thousands of African Americans left the rural South for cities in the North in a movement called "The Great Migration."  Their arrival in New York City marked a period called "The Harlem Renaissance."  In this video segment from A Walk Through Harlem, we learn that only 30 years earlier many of these descendants of slaves had worked as poor sharecroppers. Although slavery had ended, many blacks were still uneducated. Their shift to the urban North was an attempt to escape the violence and oppression they experienced in the South. They created a new voice for themselves during the Harlem Renaissance, which was a social, artistic and cultural movement.

To Kill a Mockingbird: Southern Reaction 1960

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video from American Masters: Harper Lee: Hey, Boo describes what life was like for those who challenged the system of segregation in the South in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Highlighting observations from cultural and literary icons as well as average American citizens, this video features important commentary that addresses the issues presented in To Kill a Mockingbird and how the public reacted to the novel when it was first published in 1960.

Jane Jacobs

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from New York Voices describes Jane Jacobs who worked in the 1950s and 60s to save the neighborhoods of New York City. The author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Jacobs disagreed with the notion that the city's oldest neighborhoods should be demolished to make way for high-rise buildings, housing projects and six- lane highways. Her advocacy challenged and successfully derailed Robert Moses, America's most prolific developer, in his plan to cut lower Manhattan in half with a multi-lane highway. Jacobs challenged builders to think about what neighborhoods meant to the everyday lives of the people who lived there. Jacob's ideas changed the thoughts and future for millions of people.

Newspapers in the Digital Age

Icon: 
Streaming icon

the.News reporter Antonio Neves explores changes in the newspaper business. He investigates how stories are covered and delivered and what changes in economic models are necessary to secure newspapers' continued existence. Explore how the newspaper industry has adapted to stay relevant within the Digital Age by becoming information portals and utilizing social media.

Analyzing King's "I Have a Dream" Speech Video

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video, schoolchildren take turns reading from Martin Luther King, Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream Speech" on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Traces of the Trade: The History and Legacy of U.S. Slavery

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This lesson plan is designed to be used with the film, Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, which shows one family's journey to come to terms with its roots as the largest slave-trading family in the history of the United States. Classrooms can use this lesson to explore the history and legacy of U.S. slavery and whether or not reparations should be made to the descendants of slaves.

New Muslim Cool: Interpreting Diverse Images of Muslim Life in the United States

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Help increase students' understanding of Muslim culture in the United States with this lesson plan, which incorporates clips from the POV film New Muslim Cool.

Pages