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Bilai Ansari's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Bilal Ansari is an African American father of three and a student in the Islamic Chaplaincy Program at Hartford Seminary. He works tirelessly in the Connecticut prison system, where inmates often convert to Islam, but where he is also the victim of a hate crime perpetrated by some of his co-workers.

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

There's No Such Thing As Offline?!? | PBS Idea Channel

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From Facebook to bank accounts, you always have some sort of online presence, whether you're actively engaging in front of a screen or not. Because of this we may need to re-evaluate the very word online.

Oyster Roast in Charleston | Original Fare

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Take a trip to the low country in South Carolina mud to find the best oysters they have to offer. Learn about the unique culture surrounding the fishing industry of the American South, and how an understanding of the local oyster biology has influenced the dining culture of the community.

The French Family | The Homefront

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Learn about the challenges of the military lifestyle for kids in this clip from The Homefront. Army Colonel Jeffrey French, his wife Kathy, and their three children Kyle (20), Sarah (19) and Annemarie (13) are currently stationed at the Army War College in Carlisle, PA—their eleventh duty station. For the kids, these moves have meant leaving friends and changing schools frequently—as many as nine, in Kyle's case. While deployed to Afghanistan in 2009-2010, Jeff's unit suffered many casualties, and several of its soldiers were found guilty of war crimes. Despite this challenging period, the Frenches remain committed to the Army—particularly their son, Kyle, who is following in his father's footsteps and is now a third year cadet at West Point.

FRONTLINE: Prison State | School-to-Prison Pipeline

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Experts discuss the circumstances that lead thousands of juveniles into the court system and jail each year in this video adapted from FRONTLINE: Prison State. According to these experts, in certain communities where incarceration has been “normalized,” a child’s parents, siblings, or other relations have likely spent time behind bars. The message to children is that going to jail is part of their “destiny” whether they follow the rules or not. And while the number of juvenile lockups may be decreasing in some places—with more money being directed into home incarceration programs, as in the Louisville, Kentucky metro area—the likelihood is that once a child gets involved in the juvenile court system, he or she will continue to be part of it or move to the adult system. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE collection.

U.S. Soldiers Returning from Afghanistan and the Challenges of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) | Iowa Soldiers Remember Afghanistan

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Many U.S. soldiers returning home after deployment in Afghanistan confront a new set of struggles. Many are challenged by the emotional distress of war and some develop Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

It Wasn't Called PTSD | Iwo Jima: From Combat to Comrades

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Iwo Jima was an unusual battle even by WWII’s tough standards. The 8-square mile island had nearly 100,000 combatants on it. In 36 days, 28,000 men died protecting or seizing this piece of volcanic rock…thousands of Japanese are still entombed there. Four out of every five men who fought on this island would either be killed or wounded. Battlefield ghosts stalk both American and Japanese survivors.  Although it was not called PTSD in 1945, it was just as destructive a condition. The men who fought on Iwo Jima describe how they coped after the war. And one fighter pilot describes the unexpected family event that brought him redemption. 

WVU Plays in the Orange Bowl

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Learn the outcome of 2012 Orange Bowl game between WVU and Clemson.

Is Your Social Status Making You Sick? | Above the Noise

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Financial inequality has been in the news a lot recently. It was the rallying cry for the Occupy Wall Street movement that began back in 2011, and it was at the center of Bernie Sanders’ campaign when he ran for president. This inequality creates what is typically called a social status ladder, with rich people at the top and poorer people toward the bottom. Research shows that your position on the ladder is actually one of the most powerful predictors of health. But it’s so much more than just how much money you have or how fancy your education is. It’s how you feel you compare to other people -- your subjective social status. We’ve scoured the research, looking at human and animal studies, to find out how your subjective social status actually affects your health.

Senate Republicans Reveal Health Care Bill | PBS NewsHour

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After weeks of drafting in secret, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) made the Senate version of the health care bill public on June 22, 2017. The bill shares broad strokes with the House of Representatives bill, whose approval rating is very low. It has drawn unanimous opposition from Democrats. The Senate bill would cut Medicaid funding more gradually in the short run than the House bill, but more significantly over time. The bill waives taxes associated with the Affordable Care Act and, if implemented, would allow states to waive required coverage of essential benefits.

June 23, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Is Marijuana Actually Medicinal? | Above the Noise

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With the results of the 2016 election, use of medical marijuana is now approved in 28 states, plus Washington, D.C., but the plant itself is not approved as medicine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It still remains federally illegal. Under the Controlled Substances Act, the federal government classifies marijuana as a schedule I drug-- which is a category reserved for the most dangerous drugs, drugs that do not show any medical benefit. This classification makes it difficult for researchers to study, because drugs in this category are very tightly regulated. Host Myles Bess explores the research surrounding medical marijuana and discusses some of the challenges researchers face in studying it.

Harvey Weinstein, Sexual Harassment, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 | PBS NewsHour

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Note: This Daily News Story discusses sexual harassment and assault as they pertain to allegations surrounding Harvey Weinstein. You may want to consider inviting your administrator or a representative from human resources to your class during this lesson. 

Harvey Weinstein, one of the most powerful producers in Hollywood, was fired on October 8th from the film company he founded after The New York Times detailed three decades of sexual harassment allegations against him from many women who worked for him. Weinstein had reached at least eight settlements, according to the Times’ report. Since then, dozens of more women have come forward to share incidents of times when Weinstein sexually harassed or assaulted them. While sexual assault or sexual harassment may take many forms, it is important to always keep in mind that it is never the victim’s fault.

To help define harassment and to learn more about the civil rights legislations that made workplace sexual harassment illegal in 1964, see the support materials below.

October 30, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

What Can We Learn from the Parkland School Shooting? | PBS NewsHour

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For guidance on how to talk with students about mass shootings, you may want to read SAMHSA’s “Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event: A guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers.”

A shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, a northern Miami suburb, killed 17 people on February 14 in the fifth school shooting of 2018 resulting in casualties. Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former student who had been expelled from Stoneman, was arrested soon after the shooting. He had legally purchased the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle used in the assault. In a national address from the White House, President Donald Trump said he wanted America’s youth to know, “You are never alone, and you never will be.” He said he plans to explore how to better secure schools and to “tackle the difficult issue of mental health.”

February 15, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Links to the Past

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Examine the history of the Oakhurst Golf Club in White Sulphur Springs, WV from its creation in 1884 to the present and learn about how some golf equipment and rules have changed.

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