Social Studies

ELA (X) - Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - U.S. History (X)

Calavera Highway: Connect Family Stories With History

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In this clip, two brothers recall their family's history of political activism.

The Boys of Baraka

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Devon, Montrey, Richard, and Romesh are just at that age — 12 and 13 years old — when boys start to become men. But in their hometown of Baltimore, one of the country’s most poverty-stricken cities for inner-city residents, African-American boys have a very high chance of being incarcerated or killed before they reach adulthood. The boys are offered an amazing opportunity in the form of the Baraka school, a project founded to break the cycle of violence through an innovative education program that literally removed young boys from low-performing public schools and unstable home environments. They travel with their classmates to rural Kenya in East Africa, where a teacher-student ratio of one to five, a strict disciplinary program and a comprehensive curriculum form the core of their new educational program. The Boys of Baraka follows along with their journey, and examines each boy’s transformation during this remarkable time.

Debates & the Race for the White House

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Stacey Delikat reports on the impact past debates have had on elections. Students can explore the impact past debates have had on the electoral process and major aspects of Presidential Debates.

The Electoral College

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In this video, Stacey Delikat reports on the Electoral College, specifically its importance in the 2008 election. Using the supporting lesson plan, students will understand the structure and operation of the Electoral College, as well as how it is not always an indicator of the popular will. They will also learn the importance of swing states to political campaigns, and will track the efforts of presidential candidates to win the support of swing state voters.

Abolitionist Leader William Lloyd Garrison | The Abolitionists

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Learn about William Lloyd Garrison, one of the most prominent leaders of the abolitionist movement, in this video adapted from American Experience: “The Abolitionists.” A trained journalist with a strong sense of morality, Garrison published The Liberator and was active in the American Anti-Slavery Society in the 1830s. Garrison initially preferred moral persuasion to confrontational politics, but the strong reaction to his views and the lack of progress in ending slavery eventually led him to more public acts of resistance.

What Should Be the Real Purpose of College?

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A PBS NewsHour article and video resource from Septemeber 5, 2013 that poses the question "what should be the real purpose of college?" 

How Will Thousands of Drones Impact Already Crowded Skies?

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on December 16th, 2013.

The future of aviation could be an aircraft light enough, rugged enough and flexible enough to do just about anything in the air.

Will the Rush to Correct the Health Care Website Problems Add More Complications?

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on October 24, 2013

The Obama administration has said it is making efforts to improve the health care Web site, but tech experts warn the problems are far from fixed. 

Will Fallout of 'Spying on Friends' Allegations Help Change U.S. Surveillance?

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on October 25, 2013.

At a European Union summit, German Chancellor Angela Merkel characterized the reported American monitoring of her cellphone as a "severe breach of trust."

Montana Mosaic: Mining, Labor Unions and the Speculator Mine Disaster

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Gold lured the first prospectors to Montana, and silver attracted industrialists, but it was copper that carried Montana’s economy into the twentieth century. Some of the richest veins of copper in the world lay under the Butte hill, and as the world’s demand for copper soared, Butte’s mines expanded.

Joining together in a labor union was one of the main ways workers could gain power. Unions like the Butte Miner’s Union negotiated with mine owners for better pay and safer working conditions. Improving safety was especially important in the mines, where accidents killed an average of one miner every other day in the 1890s.

 

Montana Mosaic: Experience of Indian Boarding Schools

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Boarding schools were part of an "assimilation strategy" that existed on, near and far removed from reservations. Boarding schools often separated students from their families and cultural traditions.  The boarding-school experience still casts a long shadow over the lives and the culture[s] of many Montana Indians.

Montana Mosaic: Federal Indian Policy

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When the United States annexed Montana land, it imposed federal laws on the newly acquired property and the people already on those lands. Despite tens of thousands of years that native peoples already lived in Montana—the U.S. government dictated Indian policy. Treaties, executive orders, and congressional legislation created that policy. American Indians fought this alien system in the ‘Indian Wars’ of the nineteenth century. Federal Indian policy alternately attempted to isolate Indians on reservations and to assimilate Indians into the Euro-American population. 

Poverty Rates Surge in American Suburbs

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This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on January 13, 2014.

When President Johnson declared a "War on Poverty" fifty years ago, images of the American poor focused on the inner-city and rural poor. What is the state of American poverty today? Megan Thompson reports on the less visible but growing number of poor in America's suburbs.

Students Stick Around for Two Years of College at Innovative Brooklyn High School

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Inform students about a new trend in education: higher education in high school. At Pathways in Technology Early College High School in Brooklyn, New York, students are expected to attend for six years, earning both a high school diploma and a two-year Associate’s degree. P-TECH, and other schools based on the same model, aim to give students from low-income families a head start on college with free, career-oriented coursework. For further background and materials to support student understanding of the issue, see the Teacher’s Guide, Student Handout, and Informational Text.

2014 World Cup Resources from the PBS NewsHour

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Use these resources from the PBS NewsHour to immerse your students in the 2014 World Cup. This collection includes videos, an article and a student guide.

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