Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Elementary (X) - High (X) - U.S. History (X)

Indian Police | Medicine Woman

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Joseph La Fleche recognized in 1856 that the flood of alcohol coming onto the reservation would have a terrible effect on his people. He banned liquor and even started the first Native American Police force to try to stem the flood.

History of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) | Move to Include

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The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed in 1990. The ADA has made a great impact in the lives of people with disabilities. The accommodations have increased inclusion and accessibility in the community and help everyone. At the Museum of disAbility History in Buffalo, New York we meet staff members Israel Cruz & Doug Platt to discuss the outcomes.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Indian Pride, Health: Part 2

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 Dr. Charles Grim, Director of Indian Health Services in Washington, D.C., and a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, discusses the history of the Indian Health Services department and American Indian health care, including traditional practices, diabetes, and tele-medicine.

Going to College: Inclusion in Higher Education | Move to Include

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There are college options for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. These programs connect students to the community and larger world. The continued education increases learning and skill building, social contact and better job opportunities for students. Professor Martha Mock from the University of Rochester Institute for Innovative Transition and one of the students are featured. Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Transitions to Independent Living | Move to Include

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There are options for people with intellectual disabilities to live on their own. Assisted living programs help connect adults to housing in the community and assist them in skill building to promote independence. Cori Piels describes her transition and goals for living on her own. Professor Martha Mock, Director of Institute for Innovative Transitions at the University of Rochester, discusses opportunities for people with disabilities to live independently.

Visit the Move to Include collection for additional resources.

Indian Pride, Health: Part 1

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JuniKae Randall introduction, discussion of health in Indian country including HIV/AIDS, diabetes, and other health care issues featuring Harold "Gus" Frank, chairman of the Forest County Potawatomi, Wisconsin; Lily Cummings, Pawnee Nation, Oklahoma; Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-ND), Senate Indian Affairs Committee; Mitchell Cypress, chairman of the Seminole Tribe, Florida; and Hollis Chough of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa, Arizona.

Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign | Move to Include

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Spread the Word to End the Word is an educational campaign to increase awareness for the need to respect and inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The initiative is supported by Special Olympics and Best Buddies and numerous other organizations. It promotes using people first accepting language in schools and in the community.

Visit the Move to Include collection for more resources. 

Historical Document Research | History Detectives

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History Detective Tukufu Zuberi investigates a letter which indicates that thirty years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, Booth’s father threatened to kill another sitting president, Andrew Jackson. The letter to Jackson reads, “You damn’d old scoundrel… …I will cut your throat whilst you are sleeping.” It’s signed “Junius Brutus Booth.” The writer insists Jackson pardon two men who were sentenced to death. Why did the fate of these two men enrage such fury? Was the Booth letter a hoax? Or does assassination run in the Booth blood?

A Pellet of Poison | Medicine Woman

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The strange story of how the lives of two famous women—Marie Curie and Doctor Susan Picotte—intersected in 1915. In the autumn of 1915 on the Omaha Indian Reservation in Nebraska a small package arrived at the home of Doctor Susan Picotte. It contained a tiny pellet of radium sent by Madam Marie Curie to save the life of the first Native American doctor as she lay dying of cancer. 

Earth System: Drought and Air Quality

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Droughts claim more victims each year than any other natural disaster. Depending on where it occurs and how long it persists, the cost of a drought can run into the billions of dollars. Droughts cause more than economic hardship, however. As this video segment adapted from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center demonstrates, droughts have a complex web of impacts that also affect us socially and environmentally.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Galileo on the Moon

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Galileo used thought experiments to test many assumptions, including the notion that heavy objects fall more quickly than lighter objects when they are dropped. Lacking access to either a vacuum chamber or a planetary body that has no atmosphere, he nevertheless correctly predicted that all falling objects would accelerate at the same rate in the absence of air resistance. In this video segment from NASA, astronaut David Scott demonstrates the correctness of Galileo's prediction.

Animal Shelter Photographer

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In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

Generations of Healing | Medicine Woman

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450 square miles. 1,200 patients, Indian and white. One doctor. In the years after medical school, Doctor Susan La Flesche is saving those she can save and comforting those she cannot.

The Total Eclipse of the Heartland

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“Go away clouds!” was the chant of the day at Homestead National Monument. The 2017 total solar eclipse played hide-and-seek with an enormous crowd. This 360 video captures the moment of the eclipse and the huge expectations of the crowd. Bill Nye, CEO of the Planetary Society, and Dr. Amy Mainzer, a NASA jet propulsion Astrophysicist narrate the exciting moments from the stage. (This video will be edited with other locations from throughout Nebraska, including Alliance, Gibbon and Lincoln, giving viewers a full 360 experience throughout the state.)

Holistic Medicine | Medicine Woman

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A Navajo medicine woman, Dr. Lori Arviso Alvord writes, heals with songs, herbs, sand painting, and ceremonies held by firelight in the deep of winter. She believes that everything in life is connected—humans, spirits and nature. She treats the whole person, not just the illness. Dr. Arviso practices hozho, a Navajo word meaning living in harmony and balance.

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