Science

Science (X) - Elementary Social Studies (X) - Geography (X)

Faces of the Oil Patch | Carol Goodbear (Exploitation)

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Carol Goodbear, the legislative director for the Three Affiliated Tribes, recognizes that the exploitation of oil is profitable, but at what cost?

Gooseberry Falls State Park | Two Harbors, MN

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On the banks of Lake Superior, the Civilian Conservation Corps left an indelibily legacy in Gooseberry Falls State Park. The beautifully crafted stone buildings they built at the height of the Depression stand as a testament to their hard work.

Red River Divide | Flood Control Part 2

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With each succeeding flood along the Red River, attempts have been made to develop and provide more effective permanent flood control, including earthen dikes and flood walls, diversions, holding ponds, and home buyouts. Better flood forecasting by the National Weather Service has enabled local and state governments to plan and react more effectively.

London: The Price of Traffic

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Learn how London's mayor has instituted policies that respond to the city’s growth while improving its livability and sustainability.

Harvesting Herring Eggs | EARTH A New Wild

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Using a method that goes back generations, fishermen in Alaska use an entirely natural method to harvest eggs from spawning herring. Use this resource to teach about sustainable farming and customs indigenous to Alaska and Canada.

Red River Divide | Flooding

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Learn about the history and geology of the Red River of the North and the surrounding plains, including glacial Lake Agassiz, the many floods in recorded history, and disaster relief and protection in the past. Government leaders who with dealt with the 1997 flood talk about its lasting impact and the real possibility of another flood as bad or even worse in the future.

Ecotourism | Tourism in North Dakota

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Learn how ecotourism, or adventure tourism, is the new trend in vacationing. North Dakota is working to attract visitors to its wide open spaces and to encourage them to interact with North Dakotans in their everyday and recreational activities.

The Coastal Zone: Santee Delta (00:03:47)

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The Student Host takes a boat ride with a geologist from the South Carolina Coastal Council. They travel from a landing where U.S. Highway 17 crosses the Norlh Santee River, through the delta to the Atlantic Ocean.

Ecotourism | If You Don't Build it, They Will Come

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Learn how North Dakota is using the new trend in vacationing, ecotourism (also called adventure tourism), to attract visitors to its wide open, natural spaces and to encourage them to interact with North Dakotans in their everyday and recreational activities.

South Carolina Geography | The Piedmont

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The word "piedmont" means "foot of the mountain." This region is hilly and comprises approximately one third of the state. It includes all or portions of Greenville, Spartanburg, Cherokee, Oconee, Pickens, Anderson, Abbeville, McCormick, Edgefield, Saluda, Newberry, Fairfield, Kershaw, Greenwood, Laurens, Union, York, Chester, Lancaster, Lexington, and Richland counties.

South Carolina Geography | The Blue Ridge

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The Blue Ridge, which includes portions of Oconee, Pickens, Greenville, and Spartanburg counties, is the smallest of the five landform regions being studied in this series. However, this in no way diminishes its prominence in South Carolina geography. The region is a part of the Blue Ridge Mountains that extend from Georgia to Virginia. They, in turn, are part of the Appalachian mountain system extending from southern Quebec to Alabama. This region is also referred to as the Alpine region, or simply as the mountains.

Lewis and Clark Minutes | Learning Expedition

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Hear NDSU Professor Mark Harvey who describes what Lewis and Clark would have experienced when first coming to the grasslands.

Red River Divide | Recreation

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The Red River of the North provided for commercial endeavors with the people and freight carried by steamboats earlier in its history and for commercial fisherman. Swimming in the river was once common, as were sleigh riding and skating on the ice in the winter. In more recent years, recreational fishing and boating have become more popular.

Working Landscapes - Urban Sprawl

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Many people who live in a city have the dream of moving to the country. They might desire peace and quiet, or decreased traffic, pollution, and perceived crime. For these reasons and more, people are moving out of city centers and into the outlying areas.

Shipping on the Great Lakes: Benefits and Consequences of Exporting Goods

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Learn how Lake Michigan is used for the shipping and exporting of goods. Lake Michigan is 118 miles at its widest point, 301 miles long and is the third largest Great Lake by surface area. Today Lake Michigan continues to be a major shipping route to and from the Midwest for freighters. 

The town of Singapore, founded in the 1830’s, was one of the first establishments on the Michigan side of Lake Michigan. This town started as an entrepreneurial town to rival Chicago or Milwaukee as a lake port. It quickly became known as a busy lumbering and timbering town.

White pine lumber was in great demand all over the Midwest until October of 1871. A couple of days after the Great Chicago Fire, a big forest fire burned the western side of Michigan near Singapore and depleted the timber supply. Singapore went bankrupt because of the weakened timber supply and became a ghost town.

With Singapore becoming a ghost town and no longer a Lake Michigan shipping port, timber and leather had to find a way to be shipped to Chicago and the Midwest. The town of Saugatuck became the nearest port on the Michigan side of Lake Michigan to ship goods across Lake Michigan to Chicago and the Midwest. 

With the decline of the timber industry, due to the forest fire, fruit farming was gaining popularity. Boats were needed to ship fresh fruit and leather across Lake Michigan.

With Lake Michigan becoming a major shipping route, this led to a decline in the fishing industry. 

The opening of the Welland Canal connecting the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean, via the St. Lawrence Seaway, had positive and negative effects on the ecosystems of Lake Michigan. 

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