Health/Phys. Ed.

ELA (X) - Science (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Middle (X)

Breakout Edu Kit

Icon: 
game icon

The Breakout EDU kit includes everything you need to play over 350 games created for the classroom environment. The kit includes access to the new BreakoutEdu Platform to be used while using the kit.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Middle
High
Professional
Content Area: 
ELA
Math
Social Studies
Science
Fine Arts
Health/Phys. Ed.
LOTE
Computer Science
Special Education
Family/Consumer Science
Business/Technology
ELL
Library
Other
Play Time: 
30 min.
Breakout Edu Kit

How Lead Went from Household Staple to Dangerous Toxin | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn why lead exposure is still a concern throughout the country with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 12, 2016.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Modifying Cell Genes Could Help Beat Blood Cancer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Discover how an experimental treatment could help leukemia patients with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 17, 2015.

Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Ever have an argument with someone, and no matter how many facts you provide, you just can’t get that person to see it your way? One big reason for this is cognitive bias, which is a limitation in our thinking that can cause flaws in our judgement. Confirmation bias is a specific type of cognitive bias that motivates us to seek out information we already believe and ignore or minimize facts that threaten what we believe. Studies show that when people are presented with facts that contradict what they believe, the parts of the brain that control reason and rationality go inactive. But, the parts of the brain that process emotion light up like the Fourth of July. In this video, host Myles Bess dives into the research and offers some tips to combat confirmation bias. This resource is part of the News and Media Literacy Collection.

Eating Healthy Foods

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the importance of eating healthy foods, in this video adapted from Media That Matters. A group of students present and explain the types of foods that are good for our bodies, the nutrients they provide, and how these benefit our bodies. They then explain what processed foods are, why some people like them, and why they are unhealthy.

Choosing Foods for Your Health

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn from Misty and Tim, two teens who have diabetes, about the food choices they make to help them control their condition, in these two video segments adapted from Living With MyType2. Misty is a college student learning to adapt her dietary needs to a new environment filled with options. Tim goes grocery shopping with his mother and explains how he identifies foods as healthy or unhealthy based on their ingredients and location in the store.

Why Can't Teens Wake Up Early For School? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

The research shows that teenagers are wired to sleep late, yet most schools in the US start before 8:30 am. Sleep is largely dictated by your genes. Inside all mammals is a tiny region of the brain called the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or the SCN. The SCN is referred to as the body’s master clock, telling the body when to go to sleep and when to wake up. It actually shifts as you age -- and the biggest change happens to teenagers, making it tough for them to wake up for those early classes. But schools aren’t heeding the research. Most school schedules revolve around the typical 9 to 5 workday of adults, and so there is a general worry that pushing back when school starts will be too disruptive. What’s the solution? Watch the latest Above the Noise episode to find out.

Is Marijuana Actually Medicinal? | Above the Noise

Icon: 
Streaming icon

With the results of the 2016 election, use of medical marijuana is now approved in 28 states, plus Washington, D.C., but the plant itself is not approved as medicine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It still remains federally illegal. Under the Controlled Substances Act, the federal government classifies marijuana as a schedule I drug-- which is a category reserved for the most dangerous drugs, drugs that do not show any medical benefit. This classification makes it difficult for researchers to study, because drugs in this category are very tightly regulated. Host Myles Bess explores the research surrounding medical marijuana and discusses some of the challenges researchers face in studying it.

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.