Health/Phys. Ed.

Computer Science (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X)

Breakout Edu Kit

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The Breakout EDU kit includes everything you need to play over 350 games created for the classroom environment. The kit includes access to the new BreakoutEdu Platform to be used while using the kit.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Middle
High
Professional
Content Area: 
ELA
Math
Social Studies
Science
Fine Arts
Health/Phys. Ed.
LOTE
Computer Science
Special Education
Family/Consumer Science
Business/Technology
ELL
Library
Other
Play Time: 
30 min.
Breakout Edu Kit

Career Connections | Product Designer

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See how a product designer for the health-care industry manufactures antimicrobial fabrics. To start on this career path, you should study marketing and customer service and have knowledge of consumer-product manufacturing and research.

Producer Roles | Video Production: Behind the Scenes with the Pros

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KET producer Erin Lowry discusses the roles of a producer.

Pre-Production Research | Video Production: Behind the Scenes with the Pros

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KET administrative assistant and writer Anna Gordon talks about researching in pre-production for News Quiz.

Scientists Develop Ebola-fighting Robots

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Dive into the technology scientists are developing to fight viruses with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 26, 2015.

How Lead Went from Household Staple to Dangerous Toxin | PBS NewsHour

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Learn why lead exposure is still a concern throughout the country with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from October 12, 2016.

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

How Does a Computer Diagnose Cancer?

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Discover how strides in artificial intelligence assist doctors with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from May 12, 2015.

How Do Different Social Media Platforms Affect Your Mood? | Above the Noise

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Do a quick Google search on how social media affects your mood, and the results make it seem like all the social media platforms will plunge you into depression. Facebook shows everyone’s perfect life and exotic vacations. Expertly curated selfies abound on Instagram. But, if you look at the actual research, the results aren’t that simple. In this Above the Noise video, host Myles Bess breaks down the science and cuts through the hype about the link between depression and social media use, and looks at how different social media platforms may affect your brain in different ways.

The Rise of Social Networking

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In this video segment from FRONTLINE: "Digital Nation," teens talk about why they use social networking sites like MySpace and Facebook.

Modifying Cell Genes Could Help Beat Blood Cancer

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Discover how an experimental treatment could help leukemia patients with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from March 17, 2015.

Doctors Need Cheaper, Faster Ways to Detect Ebola Virus

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See what is being done to update diagnostic tests used in the fight against Ebola with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 5, 2015.

Why Do Our Brains Love Fake News? | Above the Noise

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Ever have an argument with someone, and no matter how many facts you provide, you just can’t get that person to see it your way? One big reason for this is cognitive bias, which is a limitation in our thinking that can cause flaws in our judgement. Confirmation bias is a specific type of cognitive bias that motivates us to seek out information we already believe and ignore or minimize facts that threaten what we believe. Studies show that when people are presented with facts that contradict what they believe, the parts of the brain that control reason and rationality go inactive. But, the parts of the brain that process emotion light up like the Fourth of July. In this video, host Myles Bess dives into the research and offers some tips to combat confirmation bias. This resource is part of the News and Media Literacy Collection.