Health/Phys. Ed.

Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - ELA (X) - Civics and Government (X)

Can Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes Help Fight Disease? | Above the Noise

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In the last couple of years, the mosquito species Aedes aegypti has garnered perhaps the most attention, at least in parts of the U.S. where it resides. It’s the one that can transmit a generous selection of very nasty diseases including Zika, yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya. In an effort to control these mosquito populations and reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases, some scientists at the British company OXITEC have turned to genetic engineering. Host Myles Bess dives into the science and policy surrounding the use of genetically engineered mosquitoes to combat mosquito-borne diseases.

Healthy School Lunch Menus Spark Political Food Fight

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Use the debate about healthy school lunch rules to show students how Congress works and spark a discussion with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from May 30, 2014. The 2010 Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act required schools to use more wholesome ingredients and set fat, sugar and sodium limits. But Republican lawmakers have proposed a one-year waiver, arguing that students won't eat the new offerings or that schools can't afford them.

Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Law Subsidies

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See how President Obama responded to the Supreme Court's decision to uphold his health care law with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from June 25, 2015.

Are Energy Drinks Really that Bad? | Above the Noise

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Above the Noise host Shirin Ghaffary weighs the potential health risks of drinking energy drinks, and compares them to other sugary, caffeinated beverages. Energy drinks are a billion dollar industry and their popularity keeps growing despite health concerns. We are warned they are particularly dangerous for children and teens -- and there have even been reports of deaths linked to energy drink consumption. In this video we take a closer look at the science to see if energy drinks are really as bad as the hype, and what it is about them that has doctors concerned.

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

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Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

How Gold Star Families Became a Political Issue | PBS NewsHour

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For the sake of time, we recommend stopping the video at 3m:23s.

President Donald Trump continues to face criticism for a condolence call to the Gold Star family of Sgt. La David Johnson, a Special Forces soldier recently killed in Niger. Gold Star Families are the relatives of US military members who died in battle. There was a time when a political leader would never politicize the death of a service member or question a grieving family, said Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report. “It’s a little bit like the customer’s always right. Right? The grieving family is always right in this case,” she said. Walter added this was no longer the case after Trump criticized the Khan family, a Gold Star family, after they spoke out against him at the Democratic National Convention.

October 25, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

How Widespread Is Student Homelessness? | Above the Noise

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Student homelessness in the US is a tricky thing to quantify. HUD -- the federal government's Department of Housing and Urban Development -- controls most of the money used to help the homeless. But, that agency misses about 4 in 5 homeless students. Why? It’s all about how you define the term “homeless”. According to HUD, you’re only considered homeless if you’re living in a shelter or living on the streets. But according to the Department of Education, about 80% of the 1.3 million homeless students living in the US are couch surfing, living in motels, or doubling up with family or friends. These students aren’t eligible for HUD money, so increasingly, it’s up to schools to provide help. Host Myles Bess explores how homeless students get the help they need when different federal agencies use competing definitions to define who’s homeless.

Should Sexting Be a Crime? | Above the Noise

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Numerous research surveys and school scandals indicate that teens are engaging in sexting, and as technology and trends rapidly change, it’s hard for parents, schools and the law to create rules around this behavior. Watch the latest Above the Noise video to help students discuss the tricky issue of sexting.

Introduction to the Smoking Section

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New York Voices looks at the battle over fresh air in bars and restaurants. For reasons concerning public health, states all over the country are beginning to ban smoking in public places. For example, in 2003, New York State became the third state to stamp out cigarette smoking in virtually all businesses. Legislation ended smoking in certain restaurants, bars and other public places. Smokers describe when they began to smoke and why, how they feel about smoking and how they are viewed as smokers by others. Learn more about the controversy regarding banning smoking in The Smoking Section, another video in this series.

‘Girls Court’ Provides Alternatives to Prison for Delinquent Girls

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Find out about an experimental court for girls in Florida with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from September 10, 2015.

Does Trump’s School Safety Plan Make Schools Safer? | PBS NewsHour

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On March 11, 2018, President Donald Trump shared his school safety plan, which includes arming teachers, expanding mental health, and improving the National Instant Criminal Background System. The plan does not endorse expanding background checks. Trump backpedaled on his support for raising the minimum age to buy assault weapons, and the proposed program is being criticized for not going far enough to address the problem of gun violence. Arming teachers could make schools less safe, given accuracy problems and the potential to draw more shooters to schools.

March 14, 2018 videos and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Bilai Ansari's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Bilal Ansari is an African American father of three and a student in the Islamic Chaplaincy Program at Hartford Seminary. He works tirelessly in the Connecticut prison system, where inmates often convert to Islam, but where he is also the victim of a hate crime perpetrated by some of his co-workers.

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

Is Your Social Status Making You Sick? | Above the Noise

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Financial inequality has been in the news a lot recently. It was the rallying cry for the Occupy Wall Street movement that began back in 2011, and it was at the center of Bernie Sanders’ campaign when he ran for president. This inequality creates what is typically called a social status ladder, with rich people at the top and poorer people toward the bottom. Research shows that your position on the ladder is actually one of the most powerful predictors of health. But it’s so much more than just how much money you have or how fancy your education is. It’s how you feel you compare to other people -- your subjective social status. We’ve scoured the research, looking at human and animal studies, to find out how your subjective social status actually affects your health.

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