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Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

Building Video Literacy: Response

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The meaning of a film is not only in the mind of the filmmaker, but also in how each shot affects the viewer. Sometimes a shot evokes a very strong response in the viewer, and sometimes it evokes several more subtle responses all at once – and sometimes the response changes if the film is viewed more than once. The specific response evoked in a viewer may be very individual, but the way the shot is composed provides clues about what the filmmaker might have intended.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Producer Do?

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Producer Arielle Tepper Madover talks about taking the production of Annie: The Musical from pre-production to the stage. She discusses everything from clearing the rights to the play and hiring a director, to how she balances her roles as producer and mother.

Building Video Literacy: Purpose

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The basis for a filmmaker’s decision regarding how a shot is framed, what sound to include or add and what movement to show has to do with the purpose of the shot. Those decisions hinge on what the shot is designed to accomplish in order to create the overall meaning of the film.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Do Stage Managers Do?

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Stage managers Peter Lawrence and Rachel Wolff discuss how they keep things running smoothly backstage at Annie: The Musical. Peter and Rachel also discuss the added challenge of working with a young cast.

Gullah Music

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This video segment from EGG, the arts show describes the community of Sapelo Island located off the coast of Georgia. The original Gullah/Geechee people of Sapelo were enslaved there, but when slavery was abolished the land on the island was abandoned to the slaves. Sapelo Island's valuable land is now threatened as it is the only Gullah/Geechee island to successfully resist real estate development. Each year island residents hold a festival. In order to preserve and educate people outside Sapelo, they bring people to the island to teach them about Gullah/Geechee life and culture.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Costume Designer Do?

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Walk in the shoes of costume designer Susan Hilferty, as she explains how she creates the fashions for Annie: The Musical. Susan discusses how being a costume designer requires a love of historical research and hands-on work, in addition to an eye for fashion design.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Musical Director Do?

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Musical director Todd Ellison describes how he brings to life the symphony of voices and instruments that create the beautiful music for Annie: The Musical. Todd makes sure the voices and different instruments fit together perfectly so the music sounds clear and exciting.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Choreographer Do?

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Tap into the mind of choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler as he describes how he choreographs shows like ANNIE: THE MUSICAL. Andy first listens to the music and reads the script to create a vision for the choreography. He then dances his vision in the studio before teaching the choreography to the cast.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Director Do?

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Director James Lapine explains how Broadway shows like ANNIE: THE MUSICAL are a merger of many creative elements. James oversees all aspects of the musical, and has his hands in everything from casting to dress rehearsals. Directors may take months, or even years, to bring a production successfully to the stage.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Lighting Designer Do?

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Lighting designer Don Holder describes how even subtle changes in lighting can have a huge impact on the stage at Annie: The Musical. During just one show, there are hundreds of lighting cues, from an almost imperceptible dimming to effects large enough to make the audience think the seasons are changing.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Set Designer Do?

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Set designer David Korins explains how set design is all about storytelling. Using physical models, technical drawings, and imaginative descriptions, he walks through the vision for Annie: The Musical, set in New York City in the 1930s.

Building Video Literacy: Sound

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In this activity developed by EDC's Center for Children and Technology, students explore how sound is used to create meaning in a shot by listening for three types of sound: voice-over, music, and ambient sound.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Sound Designer Do?

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Brian Ronan talks about what it takes to make the music to ANNIE: THE MUSICAL sound great. He talks about hiding microphones in wigs and designing theaters to get the best sound quality.

ANNIE ON BROADWAY: What Does a Hair & Wig Designer Do?

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Hair & wig designer Tom Watson discusses how he creates wigs for the actors in the popular styles of the 1930s for ANNIE: THE MUSICAL. Tom explains how the wigs are made to look natural by being custom-fit for each actor, stitched by hand, and made from real human hair.

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