U.S. History

Science (X) - High (X) - Animals (X) - U.S. History (X)

Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

Icon: 
Streaming icon

[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

Icon: 
Streaming icon

(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

Icon: 
Streaming icon

[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Sweetness | The Botany of Desire

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Students consider the nature of sweetness and create a scale that allows them to measure and compare the sweetness of several types of apples, potatoes and soft drinks.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Download teacher support materials for this resource:  Teaching Tips  |  Video Transcript

Animal Shelter Photographer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment from WILD TV, meet Joyce Faye, an animal photographer. She visits animal shelters in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to photograph the homeless animals awaiting adoption. There are 26,000 dogs picked up every year in Albuquerque. Faye volunteers her time and expertise taking photographs of the dogs and cats and displays them on her web site. She hopes that people will rescue an animal from the shelter and make it a pet. Faye encourages us to do what we can to make the world a better place. Even small gestures make a difference.

February 28, 2019 | News Quiz

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This episode features stories about monarch migration, a tropical forest study in Puerto Rico, President Trump in Vietnam, space debris, the Galápagos Islands, the New York Toy Fair, Carnival in Venice, lightsaber dueling, and more. News Quiz is KET's weekly 15-minute current events program for students. The program consists of news segments, a current events quiz, opinion letters, and an Extra Credit report.

Answer this week's opinion question at the News Quiz website. You can also copy this week's quiz to use in Google Classroom.