Elementary

Computer Science (X) - Elementary (X) - Elementary Social Studies (X) - Geography (X)

Designing the Mall | The National Mall - America's Front Yard

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Learn about the evolution and design of the National Mall from its inception and explore the early considerations made by its designer, Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The design of the capitol city involved converting tidal flats, forests, and farmland into the major landmarks we see today. L’Enfant placed major landmarks on high points, placing the Capitol Building on the highest spot. Other design elements included a space for the President's house, the Washington Monument, and a grand promenade, lined with buildings and a broad canal, better known today as our National Mall.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | The Decline of Railroads and Streetcars

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Discover how the building and use of railroads declined due to the popularity of automobiles and trucks. One effect was the development of regional and short line railroads that served smaller communities. Several larger cities used local electric streetcars until the automobiles took over.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | In Mid-continent and “The Holy Dog”

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Discover how transportation has affected every step of North Dakota history. North Dakota’s position in the center of North America has always made transportation a challenge with even the earliest peoples seeking ways to cover large distances of land. The arrival of horses to the Northern Plains had a radical effect on the Native American culture and way of life.

Railroad Museum | Outdoor Nevada

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The Nevada Southern Railroad and the Boulder City Depot were built in the 1930s to bring supplies to the construction site of the Hoover Dam.

Western Minnesota Steam Threshers Reunion, Rollag MN

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Since 1954, giant iron machines have been roaring back to life each Labor Day weekend in Rollag, Minnesota. The Western Minnesota Steam Thresher’s Reunion attracts thousands of visitors each year with its 210 acres of exhibits and demonstrations. Almost nothing is static, as workers have meticulously restored and revived vintage equipment. Enjoy a glimpse of the sights and sounds of Rollag.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | “A Reluctant and Homesick Pig”

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Learn about the history of steamboats on the Red River. Although its course meandered like a lost and homesick pig, the Red River of the North was a major artery for steamboats, which coordinated with stagecoaches from St. Paul to Fort Abercrombie.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Carol Goodbear (Exploitation)

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Carol Goodbear, the legislative director for the Three Affiliated Tribes, recognizes that the exploitation of oil is profitable, but at what cost?

Faces of the Oil Patch | Howard Klug (Changes)

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Hear Howard Klug who speaks about the patience of his regular customers at the café and restaurant at El Rancho Hotel: the customers might have to wait to be seated and now feel rushed to finish because there is a line out the door.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Howard Klug (Future)

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Learn about Howard Klug, a Williston city commissioner and local business owner, who understands that some people think that people in the oil patch should have known the boom was coming, but he disagrees. The magnitude was unexpected, and he predicts that there will be more wells in the future. This boom won’t be over for quite awhile.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kathleen Enders

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Learn why Kathleen Enders of Tioga, North Dakota, views all the change in her small town as an exciting opportunity for Tioga to grow. “Our town would die and become a ghost town if we didn’t have the change.”

Faces of the Oil Patch | Triple R Transport

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Hear the owners of Triple R Transport of Williston who have found that working within city ordinances to rezone land for their business can be frustrating and time consuming. Prior to obtaining the correct permits, they parked their trucks on their land and angered locals, but as one of the interviewees puts it, "Us being able to be here takes fifteen trucks out of the parking lot of the Wal-Mart."

Faces of the Oil Patch | Caleb Frye

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Caleb Frye of the Williams County Sheriff’s Department speaks about how his job has changed with the population growth in the oil patch.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kasha Mason

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Learn about the typical housing arrangements for oil patch workers, as Kasha Mason of Mississippi explains why she prefers the term “lodge” to “man-camp” for the housing facility she runs, because of the controversy that has surfaced surrounding the multi-unit housing facilities.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Nathan Jermison (Growing Pains)

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Tioga mayor Nathan Jermison knows that the people and towns of northwestern North Dakota are hesitant to “stick their necks out for infrastructure needs” because they’ve been burned in the bust of the 80s.

Harsh Reality | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how the 1870s was an era of prosperity along the Red River, and the steamboat industry was flourishing, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. Seen as dashing and romantic, steamboats were the fastest way to travel great distances north and south along the Red River but not really the most comfortable. The boat itself was noisy and overcrowded; passengers had to deal with clouds of mosquitoes along the route; and the large boats ran aground often as they tried to negotiate tight bends in the river.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

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