Elementary

Fine Arts (X) - Elementary (X) - Architecture (X)

ArtQuest: What Is A Line?

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What is a LINE? A LINE is a mark made by a point moving through space. Join Dajiah as she finds the lines around her.

ArtQuest: How Architecture Inspires Brady Haston

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Artist Brady Haston talks to Joseph about how buildings and architecture inspire him.

Joe Mangrum: Visual Arts (Instillation)

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In this Spark video produced by KQED, see how natural found objects are juxtaposed with pieces of technology in Joe Mangrum's design sculptures. Since the mid-1990s, Joe Mangrum has been making temporary installations from found objects. Often exhibiting his designs in public spaces, Mangrum hopes to catch his viewers off guard, inserting something unexpected into their everyday routines. Spark visits Mangrum as he works on a large-scale piece for Red Ink Studios on San Francisco's bustling Market Street.

Blossom and Snappy Build Scale Models | Count On It!

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Blossom and Snappy learn about scale models and how they are used in the design and construction of buildings. They visit an architectural firm, a construction site, Clark Atlanta University Art Gallery, and Clark Atlanta University Science Center. They learn how to build their own scale model of a house.

ArtQuest: Classical Architecture at the Parthenon

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Wesley Paine explains to Joseph why the Nashville Parthenon is an example of CLASSICAL ARCHITECTURE.

ArtQuest: Style in Architecture

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Dajiah explores the different styles of architecture in the buildings around her.

ArtQuest: Geometric and Organic Shapes in Architecture

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Architect Mary Roskilly teaches Joseph the difference between GEOMETRIC and ORGANIC shapes.

Cindy Johnson | Muse Moments

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Cindy Johnson, lead botanical architect for the northern Kentucky studio Applied Imagination, shows the process used to create a botanical representation of the Carson Mansion of Eureka, California, one of the most notable examples of Victorian architecture in the United States. Standing 54 inches tall, the model uses the natural textures and shapes of plant materials to express every elaborate detail.

Speer & the City | Colorado Experience

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Robert Speer was born in Pennsylvania in 1855 and traveled to Colorado to cure his TB when he was 22 years old, which he did. In 1884, Speer ran for City Clerk, just as Colorado was hitting a large economic boom off the mining of Silver and other ore. The election was fraudulent, ballots were stuffed, and Speer won the election. The 1893 Chicago World Fair inspired Speer to beautify Denver. “The City Beautiful” was the idea put forth which involved Greco-Roman styles of engineering and a large shift towards public parks. Civic Center Park was Speer’s baby, which is surrounded by the State Capitol, the City and County Building, and the Denver Art Museum. He would move on to become mayor in 1904 and reelected in 1908, again, with suspicions of a fraudulant election. However, Speer was a brilliant politician who was able to convince wealthy people to give funds towards the construction of Civic Center Park. Speer Blvd. is named thusly as he put forth the construction of the barriers which enclose Cherry Creek today. The greening of Denver was a program to incentivize people to plant trees and plants. Speer doubled the amount of park space. Speer died in 1918, before the parks were fully completed. In 2012 Civic Center Park became a national historic landmark, one of about two thousand on the list.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

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This video segment from Building Big highlights the Clifton Suspension Bridge, one of the earliest of its kind. Though it was completed in 1864, when pedestrians, animals, and horse-drawn carriages were its main forms of traffic, its iron chain-link cables and stone piers today carry four million cars and other vehicles a year.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bill Patrie

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Learn how Bill Patrie, a North Dakota economic developer, looks for an anchor or signature building which personifies a community, has structural integrity, and is located in a town where residents believe in the future.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they uncover the history, art and architecture that define America’s living symbol of democracy and freedom, the Capitol Building.

Tour of the Rotunda | Our Nation's Capitol

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In this segment, we are taken on a tour of the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, which is filled with statues of notable Americans as well as other artwork that depicts United States history and culture.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Dunseith

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The closing of the former San Haven Tuberculosis Sanitarium in 1989 resulted in the loss of 400+ jobs. While efforts to rehab that beautiful building failed, it did result in attracting other businesses to replace the jobs in Dunseith, Rolla and Rolette.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Jamestown

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Trying to create an inviting downtown that draws residents and tourists alike, developers, including The Marcil Group, have led the way in rehabbing downtown buildings in Jamestown for a variety of uses. The Franklin School is a prime example of preserving an historic landmark building.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

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