Fine Arts

Fine Arts (X) - Science (X) - It's Okay To Be Smart (X)

What Are the Most Important Science Images Ever? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Science isn't always a visual medium, but I think it's most important moments have often been captured in photos and illustrations. I picked out some of my favorite science images from history.

Why Do Things Sound Scary? | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Why are sounds scary? They're just vibrations. Blame your brain! Join Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to Be Smart, and enter a dimension of sound, science, and fear.

Why Music Moves Us | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Why does music make us feel happy or sad? Or angry or romantic? How can simple sound waves cause so much emotion? Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to Be Smart, went from his comfy chair to the streets of Austin to investigate how it might be written into our neuroscience and evolution. Modern neuroscience says our brains may be wired to pick certain emotions out of music because they remind us of how people move!

Humans are the only species we know that creates and communicate using music, but it's still unclear how or why we do that, brain-wise. Is it just a lucky side effect of evolution, like Steven Pinker says? Or is it a deeper part of our evolutionary history, as people like Mark Changizi and Daniel Levitin argue?

New evolutionary science says that we may read emotion in music because it relates to how we sense emotion in people's movements. We'll take a trip from Austin to Dartmouth to Cambodia to hear why music makes us feel so many feels.

Claude Monet's Ultraviolet Eye | It's Okay to Be Smart

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Claude Monet had a very unique eye and it can teach us a bit about the science of vision. Join Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to Be Smart, as he explores Claude Monet's ultraviolet eye.

Space Sounds | It's Okay to Be Smart

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There is no sound in space. In the vacuum of space, there is nothing to transmit the physical waves that we need to perceive sound. This week, Joe Hanson, host of It's Okay to be Smart, features several artists using scientific data to create "space sonification" projects. From the longest palindrome ever created to a chorus created from Earth's magnetic field, these pieces lie at the intersection of art and science.