Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X) - KET (X)

Gospel Train | The Civil War Era

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In this video, students learn about "Gospel Train". “Gospel Train” is a code-word song used in the Underground Railroad by slaves, often sung just before an escape in an attempt to let all who wished to go know that the time was near. In this segment, folk singers Rhonda and Sparky Rucker perform the piece on harmonica and guitar.

 

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos | Everyday Learning

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Students attend a celebration for the Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos, a Mexican holiday. The holiday celebrates the lives of friends and family members that have died.

Jemima Boone | Drama Based on Historical Characters

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In this video, viewers watch a scene from a play about the daughter of famous Kentucky pioneer Daniel Boone. This scene opens with Jemima recalling a date in 1773. The scene transports us to that day. Daniel and his son James are setting a trap for food.

The Lancers Quadrille | The Civil War Era

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In this video, the Berea Festival Dancers perform two sets of The Lancers Quadrille, a social dance that was popular in Civil War-era America.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin | The Civil War Era

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This is a reader’s theater performance of a scene from George Aiken’s 19th-century dramatization of the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In this scene, the escaped slave Eliza reunites with her husband George and their friend Phineas. She recounts how she crossed the Ohio River with their child while escaping from slave hunters. Phineas warns them that the hunters are still in pursuit. Their exaggerated language and performance are characteristic of melodramas, which were popular at the time.

Goin' to Boston | Kentucky/Appalachian Culture

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Goin’ to Boston is a traditional folk dance enjoyed as a “play party game” in Appalachia. Instructor Anndrena Belcher teaches a group of middle school students the song and dance moves. She explains what a “play party game” is and teaches such commonly used folk dance movements as promenade, sashay, reel, and casting the lines.

About the Lancers Quadrille | The Civil War Era

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In this video, dance and music educator Jennifer Rose explains the history of The Lancers Quadrille, including the origin of the dance and why it was popular in Civil War-era America. She also discusses the movements and sets of the dance.

Outdoor Installation

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Truman Lowe, a contemporary sculptor, works with students to create a collaborative art project at Wickliffe Mounds. Wickliffe Mounds, located in western Kentucky, was the home of a now-vanished Native American society—the Mississippian culture—from about 1000 to 1300. Lowe, who is from Wisconsin is of Native American heritage, a Winnebago/Ho-Chunk. The student art installation was intended to honor the legacy of the Mississippian culture.

The Boo Hag | A World of Stories

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North Carolina-based storyteller Donna Washington tells a scary tale from the Gullah culture about a man and his beautiful wife—who is not what she seems to be. The story explains the Gullah tradition of painting doors and windows blue to keep witches away

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

Henry Clay: Colonel Tarleton's Visit | Drama Based on Historical Characters

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In this video George McGee, a drama professor at Georgetown College and a Kentucky Humanities Council Chautauqua performer, performs a monologue scene as 19th century Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. In this scene, an older Clay recalls a childhood incident—the invasion of his family’s farm by British troops the day after his father’s funeral.

Angus Augustus Burleigh, Civil War Soldier | Drama Based on Historical Characters

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In this video segment, writer/actor Hasan Davis portrays Angus Augustus Burleigh, a slave who fought for the Union army during the Civil War.

Teaching the Holocaust Through Art: Student Assessment | Murals of the Holocaust

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How does a teacher assess student understanding of the Holocaust? How should a student’s artistic work and presentation be assessed? Joiner explains why she includes students in deciding what to assess and the importance of assessing their work and art in ways that do not stifle creativity.

The Hiroshima Children’s Peace Memorial | A World of Stories

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Megan Hicks incorporates origami with storytelling to tell the true story behind the Children’s Peace Memorial in Hiroshima, Japan.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories collection.

Teaching the Holocaust Through Art: Social Justice | Murals of the Holocaust

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Louisville drama teacher Kim Joiner of Noe Middle School incorporates the arts into Holocaust history lessons. In this video, she explains how she facilitates discussions of social justice and connects study of the Holocaust to the drama classroom. She asks students to consider a central question: When do you stand up to authority instead of obeying it? Joiner explains why teachers should not be afraid to teach the Holocaust.

Teaching the Holocaust Through Art: Interpretation | Murals of the Holocaust

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Kim Joiner describes how she prepares her students for a field trip to Louisville’s Jewish Community Center to view an exhibit of student-created murals about the Holocaust. She describes art interpretation and drawing lessons, and explains how she incorporates the performing arts in ways that focus on the emotion of the event and remain respectful of the lives lost. She describes how she guides the students to create their own art in response to the murals and reflect on their meaning.

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