Fine Arts

Fine Arts (X) - LOTE (X) - Spanish (X)

Flor de Piña | Dance Arts Toolkit

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Flor de Piña or "Flower of Pineapple" is a folk dance with indigenous origins from the city of Tuxtepec in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. Girls dance geometric patterns with pineapples on their shoulders and offer them as gifts. The dancers’ long braids represent purity and their bare feet show their connections to the Earth. 

This version of Flor de Piña was performed by Casa de Cultura Hispana de Lexington at the Festival del Día de los Muertos in Lexington, Ky.

 

¡Arte y más! Lesson 20

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After the “Hola” song, Srs. Alicia and Susana use the caja mágica (magic box) to review grande (big) and pequeño (small). Then, students see a performance of “La raspa,” a traditional Mexican dance, performed by students at Northern Elementary in Fayette County. Sra. Alicia conducts a vocabulary review of el libro grande (the big book), el libro pequeño (the small book), el lápiz grande (the big pencil), el lápiz pequeño (the small pencil), la mesa grande (the big table), la mesa pequeña (the small table), la silla grande (the big chair) la silla pequeña (the small chair), la flor grande (the big flower), la flor pequeña (the small flower), el tren grande (the big train), and el tren pequeño (the small train). The video closes with the “Adiós” song.

Old Man Juan Had a Farm/Viejo Juan tenía una granja | a World of Stories

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Listen for different animal sounds in this Spanish version of “Old McDonald Had a Farm.” The nursery rhyme is available in English and Spanish. 

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

The Little Chicks Say/Los pollitos dicen | A World of Stories

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In this nursery rhyme about a mother hen and her chicks, the chicks say “peep, peep” in English and “pío, pío” in Spanish. Nursery rhyme told in English and Spanish.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

Ten Little Chicks/Diez pollitos | A World of Stories

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Count chicks in this fun game. Song avavilable in Spanish and English. 

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

 

The Butterfly/La Mariposa | A World of Stories

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This Mexican folktale that explains why butterflies do not live in houses and why they migrate. Story told in Spanish and English.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

Matlachines | Dance Arts Toolkit

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Matlachines is a traditional dance from Aguascalientes. The dance originates from a combination of pre-hispanic and colonial music and dance. It is often performed during Patron Saint Festivals.

This version of Matlachines was performed by Casa de Cultura Hispana de Lexington and taped at the Festival del Dia de los Muertos in Lexington, Ky.

 

 

¡Arte y más! Lesson 9

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After a greeting and the “Hola” song, Susana and Sra. Alicia have a dialogue to model the numbers cuatro (four), cinco (five), and seis (six). A new movement activity is used to create a simple dance sequence: baila arriba, baila abajo, a la derecha, a la izquierda, da la vuelta (dance up, dance down, to the right, to the left, turn around.) Sra. Alicia reads the chant “El gato” (the cat) and invites students to participate. Students review numbers by counting flowers before the closing “Adiós” song.

Why the Rooster Crows in the Morning (Porque el gallo canta en la mañana) | A World of Stories

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Storyteller Carrie Sue Ayvar tells a traditional Latino story that explains why roosters crow in the morning. The story is told in a combination of English and Spanish.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

1, 2, 3, ¡Chocolate! | A World of Stories

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Sing, count along, and use hand motions for the traditional Mexican whisk, called a molinillo, which is used to make hot chocolate.

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections.

 

The Little Red Hen/La Gallinita Roja | A World of Stories

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In this Mexican version of a familiar folktale, the hen makes corn tortillas instead of wheat bread. 

This resource is part of the KET A World of Stories and Exploraciones collections. 

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos | Everyday Learning

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Students attend a celebration for the Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos, a Mexican holiday. The holiday celebrates the lives of friends and family members that have died.

Alingo Lingo | Dance Arts Toolkit

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Alingo Lingo is a Mexican dance from the State of Guerrero. Traditional dances from Guerrero often have women waving handkerchiefs. Dance is very important part of the society of Guerrero. Dance is used to celebrate, evangelize, and protest.

This version of Alingo Lingo was performed by Casa de Cultura Hispana de Lexington at the Festival del Día de los Muertos in Lexington, Ky.

 

Nicte-Ha | Dance Arts Toolkit

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Nicte-Ha is a Mayan word that means "water flower." This dance is a jarana, a type of music and dance that is popular in the Mexican state of Nayarit.

This version of Nicte-Ha was performed by Casa de Cultura Hispana de Lexington at the Festival del Día de los Muertos in Lexington, Ky.

 

Cabeza de Cochino | Dance Arts Toolkit

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Cabeza de Cochino translates to pig’s head. This traditional dance is held at a festival as a sign of a productive year. The hog’s head signifies wealth and health for the family that is giving the offering.

The story behind the dance is that the family that has raised a pig takes it to the market to sell in order to buy clothing, shoes, and other necessities. The different colored ribbons are taken by each of the dancers, representing the union of the community. The dresses the women wear are called hipils and the men wear shirts called guayaberas with white pants.

This version of Cabeza de Cochino was performed by Casa de Cultura Hispana de Lexington at the Festival del Día de los Muertos in Lexington, Ky.

 

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