Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X) - Middle (X) - Architecture (X)

Frank Lloyd Wright (1998)

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Frank Lloyd Wright was the greatest of all American architects. He was an authentic American genius, a man who believed he was destined to redesign the world, creating everything anew.

Grade Level: 
Middle
High
Length: 
02:30
Frank Lloyd Wright

Speer & the City | Colorado Experience

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Robert Speer was born in Pennsylvania in 1855 and traveled to Colorado to cure his TB when he was 22 years old, which he did. In 1884, Speer ran for City Clerk, just as Colorado was hitting a large economic boom off the mining of Silver and other ore. The election was fraudulent, ballots were stuffed, and Speer won the election. The 1893 Chicago World Fair inspired Speer to beautify Denver. “The City Beautiful” was the idea put forth which involved Greco-Roman styles of engineering and a large shift towards public parks. Civic Center Park was Speer’s baby, which is surrounded by the State Capitol, the City and County Building, and the Denver Art Museum. He would move on to become mayor in 1904 and reelected in 1908, again, with suspicions of a fraudulant election. However, Speer was a brilliant politician who was able to convince wealthy people to give funds towards the construction of Civic Center Park. Speer Blvd. is named thusly as he put forth the construction of the barriers which enclose Cherry Creek today. The greening of Denver was a program to incentivize people to plant trees and plants. Speer doubled the amount of park space. Speer died in 1918, before the parks were fully completed. In 2012 Civic Center Park became a national historic landmark, one of about two thousand on the list.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

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This video segment from Building Big highlights the Clifton Suspension Bridge, one of the earliest of its kind. Though it was completed in 1864, when pedestrians, animals, and horse-drawn carriages were its main forms of traffic, its iron chain-link cables and stone piers today carry four million cars and other vehicles a year.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Bill Patrie

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Learn how Bill Patrie, a North Dakota economic developer, looks for an anchor or signature building which personifies a community, has structural integrity, and is located in a town where residents believe in the future.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they uncover the history, art and architecture that define America’s living symbol of democracy and freedom, the Capitol Building.

Tour of the Rotunda | Our Nation's Capitol

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In this segment, we are taken on a tour of the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, which is filled with statues of notable Americans as well as other artwork that depicts United States history and culture.

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Dunseith

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The closing of the former San Haven Tuberculosis Sanitarium in 1989 resulted in the loss of 400+ jobs. While efforts to rehab that beautiful building failed, it did result in attracting other businesses to replace the jobs in Dunseith, Rolla and Rolette.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Jamestown

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Trying to create an inviting downtown that draws residents and tourists alike, developers, including The Marcil Group, have led the way in rehabbing downtown buildings in Jamestown for a variety of uses. The Franklin School is a prime example of preserving an historic landmark building.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Prairie Churches | Buildings are Total Sensory Experiences

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Hear how NDSU Architectural Historian Ronald L. M. Ramsay explains that some prairie churches are lean and spare, some ornate, but all are influenced by their immigrant congregations’ old country traditions. The story of St. Joachim Catholic Church, La Broquerie, Manitoba, illustrates the point.

Prairie Churches | Hope and Prayer

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Learn about the Viking Lutheran Church in Maddock, North Dakota. Dedicated in 1909 it was at that time the largest Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church between the Twin Cities and Seattle.

Wheeling's Independence Hall

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Examine the history of West Virginia Statehood and the importance of Wheeling's Independence Hall, and learn how this building is being used today.

Spokane's 21st Century Fox | Local Landmark

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Spokane's Fox Theater has been "The Place to Go" since it opened in 1931. Lines formed around the block to view the latest feature and famous performers graced its stage. Even during its decline, the theater has retained its vestiges of elegance in its faded murals and dusty chandeliers. 

Threatened by demolition, the Fox survived the wrecking ball thanks to the efforts of the Spokane community. The KSPS documentary Spokane’s 21st Century Fox explores the history of the Fox Theater, from its grand opening in 1931 to the renovation process that led to the grand-reopening of the theater in 2007.

These video segments and accompanying learning guide will help students define and analyze “city” vocabulary words, research local historical landmarks, and examine the history of the Fox Theater, a significant cultural landmark in Spokane, Washington. Visit KSPS Education for additional educator resources.

The History of the Capitol | Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they learn more about the Capitol Building and the history that surrounds it.

Legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota | Flandrau State Park

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One of the most unusual designs build by Civilian Conservation Corps, is at Flandrau State Park, Minnesota.

Camp Washington Carver

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Explore the rich history and present day activities related to Camp Washington Carver

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