Fine Arts

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X) - Music (X)

The Wheels on the Bus

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With unique and colorful animation, this video brings to life one of the most well-known and classic children’s songs.

Grade Level: 
Primary
Length: 
00:06
The Wheels on the Bus

He's Got the Whole World in His Hands

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Based on one of the most well-known spirituals in America, He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands is a visually rich depiction of the diversity and beauty of the world.

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Grade Level: 
Primary
Elementary
Length: 
00:07
He's Got the Whole World in His Hands

Music of the American Colonies

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Copies: 1

"A fine sampling of the diverse musical traditions found in the American colonies." — John D. Barrows, manager of music and dance, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

1.   One Misty Moisty Morning (4:09)
       vocals, baroque guitar, whistle, violin, hammered dulcimer

2.   A Tobacco Song (1:57)
       vocal, hammered dulcimer

3.   Gathering Peascods (2:09)
       violin, whistle, hammered dulcimer, baroque guitar

New Arts for Old: Medieval Music 1100-1480

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Copies: 1

Explore the early domination of Gregorian chant, the flowering of love poetry in France, and much more. The liberal use of musical examples helps to convey the extrovert boldness and excitement of Medieval music. Hosted by Dr. Christopher Page, the founder and director of Gothic Voices, the first professional vocal ensemble to specialize in Medieval secular music.

Music Credits

Musick's Feaste: Music of the Renaissance 1480-1600

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Copies: 1

Follow the musical renaissance in Europe and England, tracing the spread of the Flemish School through France to Italy. Hosted by Anthony Rooley, Director of the Consort of Musicke and founder of the Early Music Centre in London.

PART ONE:

"A Pearl Distorted": The Baroque Period 1600-1750

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Copies: 1

The complex period known as Baroque embraced many different types of music and covered a large geographic area. An examination of opera, considered the great dramatic spectacle of Baroque entertainment, is also included. Hosted by Michael Oliver of the BBC Radio program Music Weekly; and Christopher Hogwood, Musicologist, broadcaster, and Director of the Academy of Ancient Music.

PART ONE:

Instruments Around the World

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Copies: 1

This is truly world music—an international collection of musical instruments, including the koto (a Japanese zither), the duda (a Hungarian bagpipe), mbira (a linguaphone from Zimbabwe), and hardanger fiddle (a folk violin from Norway). Author and composer Andy Jackson talks to Jim Smith, editor of the Sussex Tapes Music series and Director of Music at the Royal Grammar School, Worcester, U.K.

Strange Fruit: A Song Born of Protest

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This video segment explores how the song Strange Fruit became one of the best known and most enduring songs of protest. In 1939, the legendary blues singer Billie Holiday performed the song as a daring criticism of the commonplace practice of the lynching of African-Americans. Civil rights groups such as the NAACP had made countless appeals, but it was Holiday’s haunting rendition that made it impossible for white Americans and lawmakers to ignore the widespread crime.

Gospel Train | The Civil War Era

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In this video, students learn about "Gospel Train". “Gospel Train” is a code-word song used in the Underground Railroad by slaves, often sung just before an escape in an attempt to let all who wished to go know that the time was near. In this segment, folk singers Rhonda and Sparky Rucker perform the piece on harmonica and guitar.

 

Jack Frosty

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Learn the history behind the classic children's songs "Frosty the Snowman" and "Peter Cottontail" through the eyes of lyricist Jack Rollins.

Duke

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This video segment from Weston Woods presents the story of Duke by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Brian Pinkney, and is about Duke Ellington, one of the founding fathers of jazz. When Duke Ellington was young, his parents wanted him to learn to play the piano. Although he began lessons, he was soon lured away by his love of baseball. Later, as a teenager he heard the new musical style called "ragtime" and he was inspired once again to learn to play piano. Soon, he created his own style of music using "hops" and "slides" on the piano. He became a popular entertainer with a flair that attracted many fans.

Taiko Dojo: Music

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In this Spark video produced by KQED, hear the taiko drumming of Grand Master Seiichi Tanaka and the San Francisco Taiko Dojo. This art form is being performed in San Jose's Japantown as the Taiko Dojo troop seek to keep this musical form and piece of Japanese heritage alive.

Elisa Korenne: Hormel Girls

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In 1947, Jay Hormel founded the Hormel Girls to create jobs for women veterans of World War II and to promote Hormel products like Spam and Dinty Moore. The glamourous group of musicians and singers grew to include 60 members and was a top rated show on three national radio networks. The Hormel Girls are a true treasure of Minnesota history and an early symbol of the independent woman.

Please Stand for the National Anthem Lesson Plan

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This lesson plan, to be used with the program The War of 1812, has students explore what Nationalism means as well as the symbolic features of a nation such as a national anthem and a flag. Students will learn the story of Francis Scott Key and create their own anthems.

Scandinavian Traditions | Music and Tradition

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Traditional music and dance is one way that North Dakotans celebrate their Scandinavian heritage and find part of their own identity in their ethnic background. “No tree grows strong by cutting off its roots.” Understanding where we come from helps us know who we are. North Dakota’s largest demographic is people of Scandinavian descent. Many people in North Dakota are aware of their roots, know who they are, and take an active role in keeping those traditions alive.

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