Fine Arts

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Career Connections | Art Auctioneer

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Art auctioneers price and sell a wide variety of items. They usually work at an auction house and lead the bidding for live auctions.

Stephanie Syjuco: Visual Arts

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In this video, viewers learn about conceptual artist Stephanie Syjuco and her counterfeit crochet project. Often dealing with issues of globalization and outsourcing, Syjuco believes that politically engaged art can also be fun.

Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos | Everyday Learning

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Students attend a celebration for the Day of the Dead or Dia de los Muertos, a Mexican holiday. The holiday celebrates the lives of friends and family members that have died.

Please Stand for the National Anthem Lesson Plan

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This lesson plan, to be used with the program The War of 1812, has students explore what Nationalism means as well as the symbolic features of a nation such as a national anthem and a flag. Students will learn the story of Francis Scott Key and create their own anthems.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

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This video segment from Building Big highlights the Clifton Suspension Bridge, one of the earliest of its kind. Though it was completed in 1864, when pedestrians, animals, and horse-drawn carriages were its main forms of traffic, its iron chain-link cables and stone piers today carry four million cars and other vehicles a year.

World War I: Legacy, Letters and Belgian War Lace | STEM in 30

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In this STEAM inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane’s legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we’ll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation.

Building Video Literacy: Response

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The meaning of a film is not only in the mind of the filmmaker, but also in how each shot affects the viewer. Sometimes a shot evokes a very strong response in the viewer, and sometimes it evokes several more subtle responses all at once – and sometimes the response changes if the film is viewed more than once. The specific response evoked in a viewer may be very individual, but the way the shot is composed provides clues about what the filmmaker might have intended.

Scottsboro Boys Stamp | History Detectives

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THE DETECTIVE: Gwen Wright.

THE PLACE: Scottsboro, Alabama.

THE CASE: What is the connection between an inconspicuous black and white stamp purchased at an outdoor market and a landmark civil rights case? “Save the Scottsboro Boys” is printed on the stamp, above nine black faces behind prison bars and two arms prying the bars apart. One arm bears the tattoo “ILD.” On the bottom of the stamp is printed “one cent.” The Scottsboro Boys were falsely accused and convicted of raping two white girls in 1931 on a train near Scottsboro, Alabama. It took several appeals, two cases before the United States Supreme Court, and nearly two decades before all nine finally walked free. History Detectives delves into civil rights history and consults with a stamp expert to discover how a tiny penny stamp could make a difference in the young men’s courageous defense effort.

Building Video Literacy: Purpose

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The basis for a filmmaker’s decision regarding how a shot is framed, what sound to include or add and what movement to show has to do with the purpose of the shot. Those decisions hinge on what the shot is designed to accomplish in order to create the overall meaning of the film.

Into the Field | Archaeology Field School Abroad: Art Lesson Clip

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Learn about the graphic art found at the Chavin de Huantar archaeology site in Peru, and how this art was used to help develop “the idea of authority” in this region, setting the social structure “that certain people had a right to rule and a right to make demands and a right to basically run the world…” (Into the Field: Archaeology Field School Abroad, 2015). 

Islamic Art | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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The Islamic Empire once stretched from the Atlantic Ocean in the West, to India and the borders of China in the East. Over many centuries, the artistic traditions of these different regions merged into an identifiably Islamic style. The traveling exhibition "Palace and Mosque" features a world-renowned Islamic art collection. In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a guided tour of the exhibition by Tim Stanley, senior curator for the Middle East at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, provides a historical perspective and cultural context for understanding Islam through religious art.

For more resources like this, visit the collection Promoting Understanding: Islam.

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 1 of 2)

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Learn about a German immigrant artist, Berthold von Imhof, who began in eastern Pennsylvania, then moved to Saskatchewan, his base for work that spread to the Dakotas, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Prairie Churches | Count Berthold von Imhoff (Part 2 of 2)

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Learn about a Roman Catholic, Berthold von Imhoff who painted for churches of many denominations, often donating his work and making each unique. 

Germans from Russia in South America | Music

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One of the art forms deeply connected with church was music. German music is still strong and present, especially during celebrations.

Minnesota Legacy Short | Skinnfeller

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Learn about skinnfell, ancient Scandinavian art, from Karen Aakre, artist from Fergus Falls, Minnesota. As far back as Viking times, Scandinavians relied on sheep skins to survive freezing Nordic winters. Over time, women began to beautify the furry blankets with symbols that conveyed personal and family history.

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