Fine Arts

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Twelfth Night Act 2 Sc 4

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In this video from Penn State's School of Theatre production of Twelfth Night, back at his palace, Orsino summons Feste to perform a song. In the meantime, the Duke and Viola have a conversation about a certain someone Viola (Cesario) fancies, and Orsino offers his love advice. Orsino declares he will not take “no” for an answer from Olivia, but Viola protests that love doesn’t always go according to plan. The two debate men’s and women’s capacities for love, and at the end of their exchange, Orsino orders Viola (Cesario) to return to Olivia with a love token from him.

Behind The Scenes: How an Animation is Made

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Writer Adam Peltzman, animator Alan Foreman, and voice over actress Leslie Carrara-Rudolph--the principle creative team behind the Haunted House phonological series--describe the creative process behind the creation of a cartoon.

MN Original | Performer Timotha Lanae

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Learn how music has been a part of Timotha Lanae’s life for as long as she can remember. She wrote her first song at 7 years old and stepped into her first stage role during high school.

Since then, Lanae has appeared in theatrical productions both locally and internationally, and released a solo album that hit number one on the 2013 U.K. Soul Chart. She is currently working on her original musical, REDdington. Despite her overseas success, Lanae calls Minnesota home and continues to find creative inspiration in her home state.

For more MN Original resources, click here.

Jay Leno's Acceptance Speech | Mark Twain Prize

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Jay Leno thanks his audience at the 2014 Mark Twain Prize. He recounts many of his past experiences leading up to his successful career as a comedian and host of the Tonight Show.

Actors Brush Up on Their Shakespeare

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NewsHour Arts Correspondent Jeffrey Brown reports on a school where actors go to brush up on their interpretations of Shakespeare's works.

Hamlet | Shakespeare in the Schools 2016

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Acting workshops conducted by 2016 Montana Shakespeare in the Schools for middle and high school students to develop skills in improvisation, language, pantomime, stage combat, and critical analysis.

Becoming Familiar with the Text | Experiencing Shakespeare

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We meet in the Folger Shakespeare Library's Great Hall to get familiar with Shakespeare's text, and to experiment with applying tone and adding stress to the language.

Steve Martin Celebrates Tina Fey | Mark Twain Prize

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Steve Martin discusses Tina Fey's comedic genius at the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

Use this resource with the accomanying lesson plan to discuss the role of rhetoric in presentations and ceremonies, as well as the use of irony and humor in delivering a successful speech.

The Merchant of Venice: Language of Shakespeare | Shakespeare in the Schools

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In The Merchant of VenicePortia and Shylock use language to persuade a jury. Two iconic speeches, "The Quality of Mercy" and Hath not a Jew eyes?" illustrate the rhetorical devices of listing and imagery.

Putting the Language into Context | Experiencing Shakespeare

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In Folger's Elizabethan Theater, students get an opportunity to watch professionals act out a scene and then learn how to put the language into context. Then the students themselves perform a Shakespearean scene on stage.

Up On Your Feet | Experiencing Shakespeare

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Students get up on their feet to act out a scene from one of Shakespeare's plays and then discuss the techniques they've learned to portray the story and character.

Experiencing Shakespeare | Up on Your Feet

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Join us as we explore the vaults of the Folger Shakespeare Library and get your students "up on their feet" to perform a Shakespeare insult war! This Emmy Award-winning electronic field trip targets grades 6-12.

Twelfth Night Act 1 Sc 1

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In this video from Penn State's School of Theatre production of Twelfth Night, Duke Orsino, hopelessly in love with beautiful Lady Olivia, refuses to do anything and commands his servants to entertain him while he pines away for her. His servant Valentine reminds him that Olivia does not return Orsino’s affections and is mourning her dead brother. She wears a dark veil and swears that no one will see her face nor will she marry for at least seven years. Her vow to stay chaste entices Orsino more. He sulks, desiring only to lie about while dreaming of his love.

Twelfth Night Act 1 Sc 2

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In this video from Penn State's School of Theatre production of Twelfth Night, Viola and a shipwrecked crew pull themselves out of the sea onto the shore of Illyria. The captain tries to convince her there is a chance her brother survived, but Viola has little hope. The captain, a native of these lands, explains that Duke Orsino rules Illyria. Viola knows of him and recalls he's a bachelor. The captain replies that though unmarried, he is unsuccessfully courting Lady Olivia who is mourning her dead brother. Viola decides to disguise herself as a man and gain a position in Orsino’s household.

Twelfth Night Act 2 Sc 2

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In this video from Penn State's School of Theatre production of Twelfth Night, Malvolio tracks down Viola (still posing as Cesario) and returns a ring that Olivia claims she received but does not want from him. At first, Viola is perplexed, but she soon realizes-much to her dismay-that Olivia has fallen in love with Cesario. By the end of her famous soliloquy, Viola expresses concern about the love triangle that has emerged: she wants Orsino; Orsino wants Olivia; Olivia wants Cesario. Too overwhelmed to know how it will turn out, Viola declares that only time will tell.

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