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Fine Arts

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Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island | EGG: The Arts Show

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This video segment from Egg: The Arts Show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the lands on the island were abandoned to the slaves. Frankie Quimby of the Georgia Sea Island Singers speaks of her pride for the island community and the importance of preserving the Gullah/Geechee culture. She also tells how the songs of the slaves also served as escape songs. For more about Sapelo Island, see “Ben Hall of Sapelo Island” and “Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island.”

Gullah Music

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This video segment from EGG, the arts show describes the community of Sapelo Island located off the coast of Georgia. The original Gullah/Geechee people of Sapelo were enslaved there, but when slavery was abolished the land on the island was abandoned to the slaves. Sapelo Island's valuable land is now threatened as it is the only Gullah/Geechee island to successfully resist real estate development. Each year island residents hold a festival. In order to preserve and educate people outside Sapelo, they bring people to the island to teach them about Gullah/Geechee life and culture.

Chalk Sculpture | Art in the 21st Century: Paradox

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Artists Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla often begin a project by asking the question, "What are the meanings connoted by the use of certain materials?" For them, chalk is both an “ideological tool,” as something used in a classroom, and a geological substance found in the earth. Because of the nature of chalk, the artists decided to create a chalk sculpture in a public square. In this video segment from Art in the 21st Century: Paradox, see what happened when people in Peru were given the opportunity to write or create images with giant pieces of chalk in a public place and how this event addressed the topic of freedom of speech.

Dance Theatre of Harlem

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This video segment from A Walk Through Harlem features Arthur Mitchell, the artistic director and former dancer who founded the Dance Theatre of Harlem.  In 1968, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King had a profound impact upon Miller who decided to return to his old neighborhood to teach dance, thinking the discipline, focus and technique would energize African American children in their everyday lives. Often considered to be an excellent classical ballet dancer, Mitchell was also thought of as an exception to the rule. He believed, however, given the opportunity, African American dancers could also excel in classical ballet. The school now has more than 1000 young people of diverse ethnic backgrounds and cultures.

Ancestors Talk Through Drums

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This video segment from EGG:the arts show documents Camilo Molina Gaetan, a fourth grader from Spanish Harlem, as he works to become a master drummer. He is learning to play many styles of Afro-Caribbean music like the Rumba from Cuba and the Bomba from Puerto Rico. He has been playing drums since he was four years old. Camilo wants to play all kinds of drums. His teacher enjoys teaching Camilo because he says it is important to pass the tradition down to the next generation.

Maya Lin

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In this video segment from New York Voices, renowned architect Maya Lin talks about her work and identity as an American of Chinese descent. Lin has made valuable contributions to American architecture, one of the most popular and perhaps most controversial being the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Some protested her appointment as architect of the memorial because of her Asian heritage. Lin's parents immigrated to America from China to escape communism, but Maya Lin was born in Ohio. In this segment, Lin talks about a museum she is designing and how it will represent a timeline of the Chinese American experience. The museum aims to break down stereotypes of Chinese people and show their legacy of contributions as Americans.

Pulaski, Wisconsin - Polka Town, U.S.A.

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In this video segment from Egg: the arts show, we learn polka music is important to the culture of Pulaski, Wisconsin. With a population of about 2,200, Pulaski has eight to twelve working polka bands. Per capita (per person), the town has more bands and musicians than any other place in America, even Nashville, Tennessee. People from all generations there love to listen to, play and dance to polka music. Even churches integrate polka music into their services.

The Gilded Age: Architecture for the Elite | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

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This series of videos from Treasures of New York: Stanford White presents the Gilded Age, an era of great wealth and remarkable architecture. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities, students explore how architecture, literature, and art reflect the issues and concerns of the time period, and how the era still resonates today.

What Does He Have to Say to Us Today?

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In this video segment from the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man, Bill T. Jones and his Associate Artistic Director, Janet Wong, turn to primary texts to learn more about Abraham Lincoln. In an effort to make Lincoln relevant in the performance piece, Jones and Wong begin their research but along the way discover surprising attitudes, ideas and statements reflective of the controversies that exist around Lincoln today.

A Community of People Now | American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man

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In this segment from the documentary American Masters: Bill T. Jones: A Good Man, the creative process continues for the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company in the creation of a dance-theater piece about Abraham Lincoln. Bill T. Jones notes the current trend of artists creating work independent of the restrictions of previous generations. In an effort to advance the performance while mirroring the trend, Jones decides to take away some of the focus from the Lincoln family story to include the personal stories of dancers within the company.