Social Studies

Science (X) - Social Studies (X) - FRONTLINE (X)

Germany Phases Out Nuclear Power

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Learn about Germany's controversial decision to end its nuclear energy program, in this video excerpt from FRONTLINE: Nuclear Aftershocks. In the wake of the 2011 Fukishima nuclear disaster in Japan, Germany announced plans to shut down all of its nuclear power plants by 2022. Germany has decided to use coal as a source of replacement energy to maintain baseload electricity until renewable sources (such as wind and solar) become more competitive. An increased reliance on fossil fuels may have potentially serious environmental ramifications by contributing further to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.

Corporations or Consumers: Who's Responsible for Climate Change?

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FRONTLINE Heat is a global report on what is being done by the world’s largest corporations and governments to respond to the challenges posed by climate change and to the call for reductions in carbon emissions.

In this video case study from Heat, correspondent Martin Smith goes to Shenua Energy Corp. in China to examine a leading source of carbon emissions and ask who is really responsible for climate change: corporations or consumers?

Leadership on Climate Change: Can America Summon the Political Will?

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From FRONTLINE Heat, this video examines whether or not government leaders can summon the political will to address climate change.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

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Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

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Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

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Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

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Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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The Trouble with Chicken | Food Safety Standards

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Explore the reasons behind the 2011 recall of ground turkey by the meat-packing company Cargill Foods in Springdale, AK, and the implications on our food safety, in this video excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Chicken. Noticing high levels of salmonella in its ground turkey, Cargill Foods eventually recalled its product, but the delay still sickened 132 people and killed one person. The contamination also revealed serious problems with the standards and practices set by the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) public health agency the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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Teaching Tips  |  Student Handout  |  Background Essay  |  Vocabulary and Terms  |  Video Transcript

Poisoned Waters: The Startling New Contaminants

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Explore startling new contaminants in our drinking water in this video from FRONTLINE Poisoned Waters.

The Trouble with Chicken | The Dangers of Salmonella

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Learn how new and stronger strains of salmonella can impact our lives in this Media Gallery excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Chicken. Discover what salmonella is, why it’s become increasingly dangerous, and its impact on a little boy’s life in Phoenix, AZ, in 2013. Use these videos to enhance your teaching of other resources from The Trouble with Chicken and The Trouble with Antibiotics. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Caution: Video 2, “Noah’s Story,” which tells the story of the impact of a virulent form of Salmonella on an 18-month-old boy, may be upsetting to watch for some students.

The Trouble with Antibiotics | Antibiotic Resistance and Public Policy

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Learn why the FDA's first attempt to restrict antibiotic use on farms in 1977 was opposed by interest groups and a powerful congressional ally, in this video excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Antibiotics. Farm lobbies and interest groups labeled the FDA's 1977 proposal as financially ruinous and pressured Congress to slash the FDA's budget unless the agency provided specific scientific evidence. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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Teaching Tips  |  Student Handout  |  Vocabulary and Terms  |  Video Transcript

The Trouble with Antibiotics | How Widespread Is Antibiotic Use on Farms?

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Learn about the widespread use of antibiotics on farm animals and the challenge the FDA faces in collecting data about the drugs, in these videos excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Antibiotics. Learn how antibiotics have been used to promote growth and why researchers suspect that their increased use on farms is contributing to the problem of antibiotic resistance in humans. Over 70 percent of antibiotics sold in the U.S. currently go to farms; however, efforts to obtain information and regulate antibiotic use has been opposed by interest groups. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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Teaching Tips  |  Student Handout  |  Vocabulary and Terms  |  Video Transcript

The Trouble with Antibiotics | Tracing E. coli Infections Back to the Food Supply

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Follow along with scientists as they attempt to trace a virulent strand of antibiotic-resistant E. coli found in humans back to the food supply in these videos excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Antibiotics. Learn how an outbreak of life-threatening urinary tract infections in Flagstaff, Arizona, led scientists to investigate whether the meat we buy can be the source of E. coli infections in humans. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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Teaching Tips  |  Student Handout  |  Vocabulary and Terms  |  Video Transcript

The Trouble with Antibiotics | Impacts of Treatment Strategies on Farms

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Learn how increased use of one type of antibiotic can increase resistance to other types of antibiotics, in this video excerpted from FRONTLINE: The Trouble with Antibiotics. After two veterinarians noticed that cattle were developing infections that were resisting treatment with cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics that is very important to humans in treating certain infections in children and pregnant women), they conducted a study to see if they could preserve their effectiveness. The study produced a surprising result: the increased use of a different type of antibiotic (tetracycline) on farms caused bacteria to become resistant to cephalosporins, indicating that the widespread use of tetracyclines on farms may accelerate the overall spread of antibiotic resistance and have impacts on human health. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

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Teaching Tips  |  Vocabulary and Terms  |  Video Transcript