Social Studies

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Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

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[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

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(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Icelandic Animals and Scenes and Gudmundson’s Photography

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An Icelander talks about the island nation’s animals and birds and Gudmundson about his photography. Travel to Iceland where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

Gator Farm | America's Heartland

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Cattle, horses, or pigs are usually what you think of when you think of livestock. Well, in Florida this farm raises Alligators. Take a look at this unique niche farm and how they operate. 

Paying Attention in the Digital Age | It's Okay to Be Smart

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As our brains are impacted by the technology we use everyday, it seems a common subject that the digital age is overloading our brains. Sometimes it feels like we're being fed more information than we can handle, and that we're paying attention to the wrong things. However, there is debate about whether the benefits of paying attention are overblown.

Sidelined: Sports Concussions

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Find an explanation of what causes concussions and learn how computer software can assess damage due to a concussion. Also learn how neuroscientists use digital imaging to monitor long-term brain trauma. A QUEST video produced by KQED. An Educator Guide is included in support materials.

Sweetness | The Botany of Desire

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Students consider the nature of sweetness and create a scale that allows them to measure and compare the sweetness of several types of apples, potatoes and soft drinks.

League of Denial: Should Kids Play Tackle Football?

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Learn how children's brains are affected differently by hits to the head that routinely occur during football practice and game play in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is also featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids? Use the lesson to learn more about the hypothesis that "just playing the game" places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. For background on CTE, watch Introduction To CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

How Ebola Kills | Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond: Part 4

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Meet Alhassan Kemokai, an Ebola virus survivor from Sierra Leone, as he tells the story of his battle with the brutal disease. Kemokai caught Ebola while caring for his mother when she contracted the virus. For this reason, some call Ebola a disease of love: it transmits while people care for their ailing loved ones. 

Nasal Spray May Be Lifesaver for Snake Bite Victims

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Snakes! Show your students how applied science works with this PBS NewsHour story on treating snake bites from June 19, 2014. Although snake bites are rarely fatal in the United States, every year about 100,000 people die worldwide after being bitten by venomous snakes. A California doctor has developed a nasal spray treatment that halts paralysis before they reach a hospital.

Spillover - Zika, Ebola & Beyond | Full Program

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Over the last few decades, diseases that spill over from animals to humans have been on the rise. Learn what's behind the increase, and what we can do to fight these dangerous diseases. Join scientists as they investigate the rise of spillover viruses like Zika, Ebola, and Nipah, and see what scientists are doing to anticipate and prevent epidemics around the world.

League of Denial: What Causes CTE?

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Learn about one scientist’s hypothesis that “just playing the game” places young football players at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. This video is featured in the interactive lesson Is Football Safe for Kids. Use the lesson to learn more about how children's brains are impacted differently and to write down your responses to evidence that football may be unsafe for young children. For background on CTE, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial: Introduction to CTE

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Learn how the 2002 death of one of football’s greatest linemen helped bring to light a rare disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in this video from FRONTLINE: League of Denial. In 1991, "Iron Mike" Webster retired after 17 years in football and thousands of hits to his helmet. Soon after, he and his family suspected that playing football had taken a devastating toll on his brain. After Webster died, pathologist Bennet Omalu examined Webster’s brain tissue. His findings suggested that repetitive brain trauma causes an abnormal protein ("tau") to accumulate in the brain. This was the first evidence that playing football could cause a progressive neurodegenerative disease that results in permanent brain damage. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

League of Denial Update | NFL Player Quits over Concussion Concerns

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Learn about NFL player Chris Borland, who retired after just one season due to his concern about concussions, and why his decision prompted one media outlet to call him “the most dangerous man in football,” in this video from FRONTLINE. Borland left professional football, the game he loved since childhood, after reading about the effects of repeated head contact on the brain and speaking with a leading brain scientist. In response to the young star’s headline-making retirement decision, NFL commissioner Goodell stated the game was safer than ever. Estimates from actuaries hired by the NFL state that three out of ten NFL players will have brain damage in their lifetimes. For background, watch Introduction to CTE and review How CTE Affects the Brain. This resource is part of the FRONTLINE Collection.

Download teacher support materials for this resource:  Teaching Tips  |  Video Transcript

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