Social Studies

Science (X) - Social Studies (X) - Ecology (X) - Geography (X)

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Drangey Island, Godafoss, Myvatn, and Askja

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The stories of an Icelandic saga’s hero, the “Waterfall of the Gods,” thermal waters and mud pools, and the eruption of a volcano’s effect on immigration. Travel to Iceland, where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Icelandic Animals and Scenes and Gudmundson’s Photography

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An Icelander talks about the island nation’s animals and birds and Gudmundson about his photography. Travel to Iceland where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Virtual Field Trip Video: China's Great Forests | Nature Works Everywhere

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Join our expert scientist Yue Wang, a conservation planning officer for The Nature Conservancy, on a virtual field trip across the world to two stunning provinces in China—Sichuan and Yunnan—where we will explore majestic forests, towering mountains, and other iconic landscapes. While examining the role these vital natural areas play in the carbon cycle and climate change, as well as the benefits of reforestation, we will learn about the magnificent creatures who call these habitats home: giant pandas, golden snub-nosed monkeys, and the elusive and odd-looking takin. 

Find a teacher's guide here to accompany this field trip.

Healing Mother Earth for Future Generations

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Listen as Native Americans share their concerns about climate change, in this video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College. See photographs from the past and hear one woman describe how tribal people were the first environmentalists. In addition, learn how people are noticing that they are losing sacred plants and are concerned for the future. Finally, hear about the importance of education to help future generations live in harmony with Mother Earth.

Preserving the Forest of the Sea

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The University Herbarium at the University of California - Berkeley boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States, dating back to the time of the U.S. Civil War. Kathy Ann Miller, a curator at the herbarium, leads a massive project to digitize nearly 80,000 specimens of seaweed collected from the west coast of North America. When the project is finished, researchers from around the world will be able to go online and see the digital photographs along with collection information and a map of where the seaweeds were originally collected. 

Five Years Later, What Were the Effects of the BP Oil Spill?

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Explore the long-term effects of the BP oil spill off the coast of Louisiana with this video and educational resources from PBS NewsHour from April 20, 2015.

Bridging Culture, Community and Science

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CREST models an interdisciplinary approach to connecting students to their threatened communities, using technology as a tool and place-based education as a vehicle. By engaging in local projects based in the surrounding Gulf of Maine ecosystem, students learn to apply science and technology skills to support their community’s natural, social, and economic resources.

From the Ground to the Cloud: Transforming Chimpanzee Conservation with High-Tech Tools

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Watch how the Jane Goodall Institute uses mapping technology on mobile devices for forest monitoring and chimpanzee conservation.

POV | Good Fortune: Lessons in International Development

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In this lesson, students will watch video clips and read interviews with experts that will help them examine different approaches to international aid and development and begin to identify which approaches are most effective. The lesson features excerpts from the film Good Fortune, which presents the viewpoints of two Kenyans who resist development projects intended to improve quality of life in their country.

Water Pollution Investigation

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Water pollution is the contamination of water resources by harmful wastes or toxins. This type of pollution can be dangerous to animals and plant populations in and around lakes, rivers, polluted groundwater areas or oceans, and can pose major problems for humans as well. Explore the detrimental effects of plastic waste pollution on the San Francisco Bay—specifically, mercury contamination, with this resource group from QUEST.

Where's Plum From?

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Meet Plum, a friendly purple alien—and video game designer—from the barren planet Blorb, in this video from PLUM LANDING. She's visiting Planet Earth to collect data for a new game for her fellow Blorbians. Plum can’t leave her spaceship, so she befriends a group of kids on Earth and sends them on missions to trek across deserts, plunge over waterfalls, climb mountains, and journey through the jungle, in order to learn all about life on Earth.

Why Does Climate Change Matter?

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In this video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College, hear young Native Americans talk about climate change. Listen as they respond to the question, "Why does climate change matter?" They share their opinions about the importance of climate; their thoughts on how climate change is affecting weather, oceans, and ice; and their fears about the impacts for future generations.

A History of Colonization | Children of the Amazon: Part 5

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Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home. This excerpt deals with the incursion of the outside world into the people who lived in the forest, starting in 1907.

The Coastal Zone: Santee Delta (00:03:47)

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The Student Host takes a boat ride with a geologist from the South Carolina Coastal Council. They travel from a landing where U.S. Highway 17 crosses the Norlh Santee River, through the delta to the Atlantic Ocean.

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