Social Studies

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Ebola in the News | Second Ebola Diagnosis Shows Danger for Health Workers

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During the 2014 Ebola outbreak in Western Africa, PBS NewsHour interviewed registered nurse Katy Roemer and history of medicine Professor Howard Markel on the dangers of Ebola for U.S. health workers.

Use this collection of news stories and resources from the PBS NewsHourto understand the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa.

POV | Good Fortune: Lessons in International Development

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In this lesson, students will watch video clips and read interviews with experts that will help them examine different approaches to international aid and development and begin to identify which approaches are most effective. The lesson features excerpts from the film Good Fortune, which presents the viewpoints of two Kenyans who resist development projects intended to improve quality of life in their country.

A History of Colonization | Children of the Amazon: Part 5

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Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home. This excerpt deals with the incursion of the outside world into the people who lived in the forest, starting in 1907.

A Rubber Tapping Invasion | Children of the Amazon: Part 4

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Rubber tapping used to be a sustainable process at the turn of the century, but the growth of industry and outside culture in the forest seeded conflict between rubber barons and the indigenous communities. Children of the Amazon invites you to see through the eyes of these inspiring and remarkably resilient people whose lives are transformed by a road carved through their forest home by an outside world.

Nature's First Defenders: Video | Nature Works Everywhere

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Indigenous people—nature’s first defenders—play a vital role in sustaining our planet. This video, along with the accompanying Nature's First Defenders teacher's guide and lessons, enables students to understand that role and to explore the many perspectives and issues involved in conservation, including how we relate to nature, how culture influences our points of view, what tools we have to be engaged in the conversation, and how we might address and reconcile differences.

 

Changes to the People and Culture | Children of the Amazon: Part 3

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A visit to the town of Cacoal shows just how much the Amazon has changed over the last few decades, and how the influx of manufactured goods, materials, and beliefs has impacted the indigenous community. See how the old traditions have been shaped by this new influence, and through the lesson plan below, explore the difference between things that we want and things that we need.

Arctic Thaw | PBS Newshour

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Alert students to the environmental crisis in the Arctic with this PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from September 18, 2013.  Glaciers in the Arctic are now melting at a faster pace than they were only a few years ago, damaging wildlife habitats and opening up potentially dangerous new shipping lanes.

NOVA: Becoming Human | Diatoms Measure Climate Change

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Learn how scientists used the fossils of one-celled aquatic organisms, called diatoms, to understand ancient climate conditions in eastern Africa, in this video from NOVA: Becoming Human. White layers of a rock formation consist of deep-water diatoms and darker layers consist of shallow-water diatoms; the scientists interpreted the alternating layers in the formation to mean that a massive lake appeared and disappeared many times in their study area. If this part of Africa indeed experienced wet and dry periods over time, this supports a new idea that suggests climatic variability may have shaped human evolution.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

West Virginia | Three Rivers: The Bluestone, Gauley and New

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3 Rivers: the Bluestone, Gauley, and New documents the economic, social, and political impact of the rivers on Southern and Central West Virginia.  Included in Teachers Resources is a cross-curricular unit which addresses the West Virginia Content Standards and Objectives for 8th grade West Virginia Studies.  The video is divided into 4 chapters: Introduction, Bluestone, Gauley, and New.  Curriculum is available under the Resource tab by the content area.