Social Studies

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Homo Sapiens Versus Neanderthals

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Explore the origins of modern humans. Fossil evidence from Middle East caves and elsewhere has revealed some competitive advantages modern humans, known as Homo sapiens, are believed to have held over the more archaic human species, Neanderthals. For example, during the time in which the two species may have coexisted, Homo sapiens lived on high ground, from which they could survey the landscape and plan their hunting expeditions. Some scientists have theorized that the success of this strategy may have contributed to the demise of the valley-dwelling Neanderthals, who became extinct about 30,000 years ago. Adapted from NOVA.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

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[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

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(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Wild Horses | Outdoor Nevada

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Nevada contains the largest population of wild horses in the United States. Due to extended drought conditions in the Nevada desert and the risk posed to other wildlife, the Bureau of Land Management has taken measures to control the population of wild horses.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Drangey Island, Godafoss, Myvatn, and Askja

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The stories of an Icelandic saga’s hero, the “Waterfall of the Gods,” thermal waters and mud pools, and the eruption of a volcano’s effect on immigration. Travel to Iceland, where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

A Photographer’s View of Iceland | Icelandic Animals and Scenes and Gudmundson’s Photography

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An Icelander talks about the island nation’s animals and birds and Gudmundson about his photography. Travel to Iceland where the beautiful landscape and friendly people have inspired countless artists, including Wayne Gudmundson, to capture the sights and explore its volcanic majesty.

Primitive Technology | Georgia Stories

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Primitive cultures living in Georgia thousands of years ago made everything they needed. Today it is important to the surviving native cultures to continue practicing the skills and sharing the traditions that ensured survival.

The Human Spark | The Art Spark

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In this video segment from The Human Spark, host Alan Alda ventures to Southwestern France where it is believed Neanderthals first made their homes in rock shelters. The crew makes their way to Cat Blanc, one of the rock shelters speculated to have sheltered not only Neanderthals, but also early humans. Horse carvings made from fifteen to twenty thousand years ago by early humans indicate that they brought with them something the Neanderthals lacked - "the human spark."

Gator Farm | America's Heartland

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Cattle, horses, or pigs are usually what you think of when you think of livestock. Well, in Florida this farm raises Alligators. Take a look at this unique niche farm and how they operate. 

Global Gardens: Video | Nature Works Everywhere

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Urban gardens are powerful tools that can help grow healthy food, reduce our carbon footprint, and increase the overall health of our city environments. By creating a small, contained habitat for plants, pollinators, and other creatures, these tiny garden ecosystems actually contain a huge diversity of animals. This video explores the role that urban gardens can have on an individual, a local, and on a global scale.

Find a lesson plan here to accompany this video.

Sustainable Cities: Nature Based Solutions in Urban Design: Video | Nature Works Everywhere

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This video was created by The Nature Conservancy, with help from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the City of Winnipeg Water and Waste Department, and D.C. Water.

The following lesson plans are designed to be used with this video:

 

 

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Virtual Field Trip Video: China's Great Forests | Nature Works Everywhere

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Join our expert scientist Yue Wang, a conservation planning officer for The Nature Conservancy, on a virtual field trip across the world to two stunning provinces in China—Sichuan and Yunnan—where we will explore majestic forests, towering mountains, and other iconic landscapes. While examining the role these vital natural areas play in the carbon cycle and climate change, as well as the benefits of reforestation, we will learn about the magnificent creatures who call these habitats home: giant pandas, golden snub-nosed monkeys, and the elusive and odd-looking takin. 

Find a teacher's guide here to accompany this field trip.

The Garden (Clip 3) | Exploring Monticello

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In this segment of Exploring Monticello, we learn about Jefferson's vast garden where he experimented with growing many different varieties of vegetables.

Exploring Monticello takes students into Thomas Jefferson’s home, a virtual laboratory for all kinds of ideas. Thomas Jefferson is best known for authoring the Declaration of Independence and becoming the third President of the United States, but he also had a great love for innovations which made him one of America’s first great scientists.  This LIVE interactive streaming field trip gives students the opportunity to experience scientific discovery within the context of history, and to consider the creative process inherent in making something new and innovative.

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