Social Studies

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Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

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[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

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(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Know Ohio: Invention of the Pop Tab, Traffic Signal, and a Gas Mask

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The African-American Ohio inventor, Garrett Morgan, created an early version of the traffic signal and gas mask.  Inventor Earnie Fraze dreamed up the pull tab still popular on beverage cans, today! This video provides a look back to what inspired these inventions.

Pourquoi Stories | Jakers!

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This video segment from Jakers features a storyteller who tells a Pourquoi story about a spider. Pourquoi is the French word for "why". Pourquoi stories try to explain in an entertaining way why something happens or why things are the way they are, especially in nature. This lively story is about Anansi the Spider, a popular character in African folklore. We hear an imaginary tale that tries to explain why the lowest part of a spider's body is so big. Could it really be because of the plan the greedy spider Anansi came up with to eat two feasts in one day?

The Dirt on Dirt | Sid the Science Kid

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In this episode of Sid the Science Kid, Sid and his friends lean that dirt is really important to the Earth because it helps things grow, and it's also filled with tiny rocks, pieces of leaves, and even living things like bugs and worms!

Maiasaura Nest

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In this Dinosaur Train clip, Mrs. Pteranodon meets fellow mom Millie Maiasaura. The two compare parenting techniques.

Nature Cat | The Groundhog Way

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It’s Groundhog Day! Today the Groundhog should tell our pals if Spring will come early or if Winter will stay around longer.

Puppy Walker

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In this segment from Zoom into Action, Brett trains puppies to be seeing-eye dogs. He volunteers as a puppy walker for the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind. He is working with a puppy named Arty for one year. His job is to socialize Arty and teach him to follow commands. At the end of the year, Brett has to bring Arty back for more training so he will be ready to work with a person who has a visual imparity. Brett knows his work is for a very good cause. When it’s time to give up the puppy, he isn’t too disappointed.

Nature Cat | Hooray It's Arbor Day

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While celebrating Arbor Day and their love for trees over in the forest, a heavy wind blows Squeeks’ favorite climbing tree halfway over. It’s up to Nature Cat and his pals to try and save the tree for Squeeks, for all the critters that live in the tree, and for Arbor Day!

Harvesting Herring Eggs | EARTH A New Wild

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Using a method that goes back generations, fishermen in Alaska use an entirely natural method to harvest eggs from spawning herring. Use this resource to teach about sustainable farming and customs indigenous to Alaska and Canada.

Trackers

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This WILD TV segment introduces John Stokes, and some friends, who are a part of the Tracking Project in New Mexico. A tracker reads the prints on the ground made by an animal or person. Mr. Stokes teaches us how to be trackers in this clip. To be a tracker, you must move slowly, be very quiet, and stay downwind of whatever you are tracking. We also learn how to make a tracking stick, which can help get even more information.

The Coastal Zone: Santee Delta (00:03:47)

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The Student Host takes a boat ride with a geologist from the South Carolina Coastal Council. They travel from a landing where U.S. Highway 17 crosses the Norlh Santee River, through the delta to the Atlantic Ocean.

Historic Relationships Between Dogs and Humans

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In this video segment from Nature, we learn that dogs were the first creatures to be domesticated. Ancient people thought of dogs as creatures of magic and as spiritual guardians. Dogs were often sacrificed and buried with people to protect them with their magical powers. In Mexico today, hairless Xolo (SHOW-low) dogs are believed to heal pain. Around the world dogs are useful to people for protection because of their bark, which acts as an alarm and can intimidate strangers. Barking dogs are a stronger deterrent for burglars than a burglar alarm.

Lewis and Clark Minutes | Learning Expedition

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Hear NDSU Professor Mark Harvey who describes what Lewis and Clark would have experienced when first coming to the grasslands.

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