Social Studies

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Wild Horses | Outdoor Nevada

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Nevada contains the largest population of wild horses in the United States. Due to extended drought conditions in the Nevada desert and the risk posed to other wildlife, the Bureau of Land Management has taken measures to control the population of wild horses.

Adopting Sustainable Food Practices

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This video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College looks at how the traditional subsistence practices of indigenous people were once sustainable, unlike today's lifestyles. Most foods are now produced and transported using methods that can damage the environment and contribute to climate change.

Virtual Field Trip Video: China's Great Forests | Nature Works Everywhere

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Join our expert scientist Yue Wang, a conservation planning officer for The Nature Conservancy, on a virtual field trip across the world to two stunning provinces in China—Sichuan and Yunnan—where we will explore majestic forests, towering mountains, and other iconic landscapes. While examining the role these vital natural areas play in the carbon cycle and climate change, as well as the benefits of reforestation, we will learn about the magnificent creatures who call these habitats home: giant pandas, golden snub-nosed monkeys, and the elusive and odd-looking takin. 

Find a teacher's guide here to accompany this field trip.

Where's Plum From?

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Meet Plum, a friendly purple alien—and video game designer—from the barren planet Blorb, in this video from PLUM LANDING. She's visiting Planet Earth to collect data for a new game for her fellow Blorbians. Plum can’t leave her spaceship, so she befriends a group of kids on Earth and sends them on missions to trek across deserts, plunge over waterfalls, climb mountains, and journey through the jungle, in order to learn all about life on Earth.

Animals, Maps, and Habitats, Oh My!

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In this STEM activity from Cyberchase, students watch a video in which a habitat has been disturbed by the construction of a bike path. They then use x and y coordinates to locate items on a map and find a solution to the problem posed in the video.

Extend the learning with the related Cyberchase at-home activity Habitat Mapping Game.

Why Does Climate Change Matter?

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In this video segment adapted from United Tribes Technical College, hear young Native Americans talk about climate change. Listen as they respond to the question, "Why does climate change matter?" They share their opinions about the importance of climate; their thoughts on how climate change is affecting weather, oceans, and ice; and their fears about the impacts for future generations.

The Coastal Zone: Santee Delta (00:03:47)

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The Student Host takes a boat ride with a geologist from the South Carolina Coastal Council. They travel from a landing where U.S. Highway 17 crosses the Norlh Santee River, through the delta to the Atlantic Ocean.

Navajo Elders' Observations on Climate Change

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In this video segment adapted from Navajo Technical College, two Navajo Elders speak about climate change and the differences in the environment that they have observed. They have noticed changes in the rainy season, including more violent storms, and changes in the characteristics of both wind and snow. They describe the disappearance of some plants during their lifetime and express concern about how changes in climate are negatively affecting people and animals.

Virtual Field Trip Video: Wild Biomes | Nature Works Everywhere

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On this virtual field trip, you’ll travel to the lush, rain-soaked splendor of Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula and explore the urban watershed of Seattle. Then you’ll head to Arizona’s dry, desert landscape and take a tour down the Verde River, one source of water that nourishes this parched land. Join The Nature Conservancy's water scientist Kari Vigerstol to find out how geography, people, and water interact in two of America’s “wildly” unique biomes. The field trip is geared toward grades 3-8 in the areas of science and geography. Download the teacher's guide for post-viewing discussion questions and related activities. The content of this virtual field trip is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and the National Geography Standards.

Nature's First Defenders: Video | Nature Works Everywhere

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Indigenous people—nature’s first defenders—play a vital role in sustaining our planet. This video, along with the accompanying Nature's First Defenders teacher's guide and lessons, enables students to understand that role and to explore the many perspectives and issues involved in conservation, including how we relate to nature, how culture influences our points of view, what tools we have to be engaged in the conversation, and how we might address and reconcile differences.

 

Okefenokee Swamp | Live Exploration

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Explore one of the last frontiers of true Georgia wilderness with GPB Education's live exploration of the Okefenokee Swamp. Hear from swamp experts, witness the power of the mighty alligator, and test your swamp knowledge!

The Value of Grasslands: Video | Nature Works Everywhere

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Grasslands have grown to be a massively undervalued ecosystem, but a recent surge of ecotourism in grassland systems have given the land new value. In this video, explore the balance between ecotourism and environmental stability, and learn about how people all over the world are living together with grasslands. 

The following lesson plans support this video:

 

 

Fossil Hunting | Outdoor Nevada

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Join host John Burke as he hunts for fossils at Tule Springs, near Las Vegas.

Lewis and Clark Minutes | Learning Expedition

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Hear NDSU Professor Mark Harvey who describes what Lewis and Clark would have experienced when first coming to the grasslands.

Witnessing Environmental Changes

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This video segment examines the issue of climate change from the perspective of Native Americans. Elders describe the changes they have observed in their surroundings, especially those related to water, and the effects they are having on their way of life. Dr. Daniel Wildcat explains that because Native people are so deeply connected to the land, non-Native people should consult with Native people about what we are experiencing. The video segment was adapted from a student video produced at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas.

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