Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Health/Phys. Ed. (X) - Civics and Government (X) - U.S. History (X)

Environmental Justice: Opposing a Toxic Waste Landfill

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment, adapted from Earthkeeping: Toxic Racism, learn about the beginning of the environmental justice movement. Meet various experts and leaders who describe the issues of environmental racism and justice, and learn about the watershed event—the controversy over the location of a toxic landfill in Warren County, North Carolina—that brought the issues to national attention in the early 1980s. See footage of the residents protesting the transport of PCB-contaminated soil to their community, and hear about how the incident triggered further investigations into the relationship between communities of color and toxins.

Be Kind Online

Icon: 
Streaming icon

How do we act when we are on the Internet? Here are some good manners for when we are on the Internet. Use good words, not rude or bad words. Be patient with others. Sometimes others are beginners and are just learning how to use the Internet.

In Case of Emergency, Please Dial... (How Police Train Immigrants for Emergencies)

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Not knowing local laws and emergency response procedures can be a serious problem. That’s why the Metropolitan Police Department of the City of St. Louis conducts safety meetings at the International Institute of St. Louis to help bring immigrants up to speed on local procedures, including when to dial 911. It’s also helpful for officers to establish a relationship with the community and clear up any misconceptions about police that immigrants may bring from their home countries.

Chris Rock Discusses Integration in Baseball | Ken Burns & Lynn Novick: Baseball - The Tenth Inning

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Comedian Chris Rock and others discuss affirmative action, home runs, and integration in baseball.

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

What Other Countries Can Teach Us About Good Schools

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This Daily News Story from PBS NewsHour Extra was created on September 25, 2013.

Despite increases in education spending and a decade of school reform, students in the United States still lag behind their peers in many other countries when it comes to math, science and reading skills.

Does Trump’s School Safety Plan Make Schools Safer? | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

On March 11, 2018, President Donald Trump shared his school safety plan, which includes arming teachers, expanding mental health, and improving the National Instant Criminal Background System. The plan does not endorse expanding background checks. Trump backpedaled on his support for raising the minimum age to buy assault weapons, and the proposed program is being criticized for not going far enough to address the problem of gun violence. Arming teachers could make schools less safe, given accuracy problems and the potential to draw more shooters to schools.

March 14, 2018 videos and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Constitution USA | Created Equal

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Peter Sagal explores the high ideals of the Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal,” endowed with “inalienable rights,” that didn’t make it into the Constitution in 1787. The Fourteenth Amendment tries to incorporate the words of the Declaration into the Constitution. The far-reaching changes created by that amendment established new notions of citizenship, equal protection, due process, and personal liberty and today those notions are being used to fight for same sex marriage, voting rights, affirmative action, and immigration reform. 

Bilai Ansari's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Bilal Ansari is an African American father of three and a student in the Islamic Chaplaincy Program at Hartford Seminary. He works tirelessly in the Connecticut prison system, where inmates often convert to Islam, but where he is also the victim of a hate crime perpetrated by some of his co-workers.

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

U.S. Soldiers Returning from Afghanistan and the Challenges of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) | Iowa Soldiers Remember Afghanistan

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Many U.S. soldiers returning home after deployment in Afghanistan confront a new set of struggles. Many are challenged by the emotional distress of war and some develop Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Senate Republicans Reveal Health Care Bill | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

After weeks of drafting in secret, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) made the Senate version of the health care bill public on June 22, 2017. The bill shares broad strokes with the House of Representatives bill, whose approval rating is very low. It has drawn unanimous opposition from Democrats. The Senate bill would cut Medicaid funding more gradually in the short run than the House bill, but more significantly over time. The bill waives taxes associated with the Affordable Care Act and, if implemented, would allow states to waive required coverage of essential benefits.

June 23, 2017 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

What Can We Learn from the Parkland School Shooting? | PBS NewsHour

Icon: 
Streaming icon

For guidance on how to talk with students about mass shootings, you may want to read SAMHSA’s “Tips for Talking With and Helping Children and Youth Cope After a Disaster or Traumatic Event: A guide for Parents, Caregivers, and Teachers.”

A shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, a northern Miami suburb, killed 17 people on February 14 in the fifth school shooting of 2018 resulting in casualties. Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former student who had been expelled from Stoneman, was arrested soon after the shooting. He had legally purchased the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle used in the assault. In a national address from the White House, President Donald Trump said he wanted America’s youth to know, “You are never alone, and you never will be.” He said he plans to explore how to better secure schools and to “tackle the difficult issue of mental health.”

February 15, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Steven Gamez's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This film tells the story of Steven Gamez who is studying to become a Catholic Priest. Steven is a Tejano (Texan-Mexican), born and raised on San Antonio’s rough West Side. He dreams of returning to his neighborhood and serving the poor.

Pages