Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Human ecology (X) - Geography (X) - U.S. History (X)

Old to New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize | Grand Forks

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Like many cities, Grand Forks had seen a decline in activity and economic development in its downtown area during the 1960s and 1970s which was escalated by the devastating flood of 1997. Federal assistance and local restoration projects have revitalized the area by rehabilitating the buildings that could be saved.

For decades, “downtown” was the hub of the economic and social lives of rural residents across North Dakota. But today, these same downtowns are struggling to maintain their vitality. Seeking to reverse years of decline, visionaries are taking steps to revitalize their communities by rehabilitating old buildings and putting them to new uses, helping small towns preserve their identity and quality of life. Old To New: Remodel, Restore, Revitalize showcases some of the new ideas being implemented today and their implications for community leaders. As one rehab leader said, “Nothing’s ever going to be 200 years old, if you don’t let it get to be 100 years old.”

Elisa Korenne: Steamboats on the Red

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Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it's hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul and Winnipeg. This original song by Minnesota musician Elsia Korenne tells the tale of willpower and cut-throat competition that brought steamboats to the Red and made them work.

A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson | Segues Between Experiences

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Gudmundson evolves into visually recording social issues related to the landscape.

Wayne Gudmundson’s black-and-white photographs are admired not only for their beauty, but also for their cultural significance – they capture the grandeur of Gudmundson’s native North Dakota landscape with a focus that evokes a meaningful sense of place. A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson chronicles the route this prolific photographer has taken – how his Icelandic heritage relates to his craft, the mentors and muses that inspire him, the students who enthuse him, and the philosophy that explains his considered view.

A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson | Teacher and Visual Artist

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Gudmundson is both a Zen master in the classroom and a nationally recognized photographic artist.

Wayne Gudmundson’s black-and-white photographs are admired not only for their beauty, but also for their cultural significance – they capture the grandeur of Gudmundson’s native North Dakota landscape with a focus that evokes a meaningful sense of place. A Considered View: The Photography of Wayne Gudmundson chronicles the route this prolific photographer has taken – how his Icelandic heritage relates to his craft, the mentors and muses that inspire him, the students who enthuse him, and the philosophy that explains his considered view

218: Modern Georgia, Part VI | Georgia Stories

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Modern Georgia thrives off of ever growing industries.

Segments: Granite Capital of the World; Granite Sculptor; The Second Busiest Airport in the World

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | The Decline of Railroads and Streetcars

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Discover how the building and use of railroads declined due to the popularity of automobiles and trucks. One effect was the development of regional and short line railroads that served smaller communities. Several larger cities used local electric streetcars until the automobiles took over.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | “A Reluctant and Homesick Pig”

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Learn about the history of steamboats on the Red River. Although its course meandered like a lost and homesick pig, the Red River of the North was a major artery for steamboats, which coordinated with stagecoaches from St. Paul to Fort Abercrombie.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Red River Oxcarts

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Learn about the Red River oxcarts that were the primary means of transporting goods from the Red River Valley to St. Paul.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Kathleen Enders

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Learn why Kathleen Enders of Tioga, North Dakota, views all the change in her small town as an exciting opportunity for Tioga to grow. “Our town would die and become a ghost town if we didn’t have the change.”

Cheaper Routes | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about the problems boat captains faced in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. Piloting steamboats on the shallow Red River wasn’t without its share of problems: getting stuck, boats sinking, and turning the boats around were just some of the problems the boat captains faced.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Harsh Reality | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn about how the 1870s was an era of prosperity along the Red River, and the steamboat industry was flourishing, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. Seen as dashing and romantic, steamboats were the fastest way to travel great distances north and south along the Red River but not really the most comfortable. The boat itself was noisy and overcrowded; passengers had to deal with clouds of mosquitoes along the route; and the large boats ran aground often as they tried to negotiate tight bends in the river.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

New Cargo | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how, beginning in the late 1880s and early 1900s, the cargo transported on the steamboats changed from buffalo robes and furs to hard spring wheat, in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. As a result, grain elevators were built along the banks of the river, and farmers were able to get their crops to market fairly quickly.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Turning Point | Steamboats on the Red

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Learn how in 1878, the railroad crossing Minnesota reached Pembina—establishing a rail link between St. Paul and Winnipeg—in this video from the Steamboats on the Red series. The link opened up the way goods could be transported from one city to another. Ironically, the first steam train to arrive in western Canada arrived via a steamboat traveling along the Red River. After the railroad arrived, the steamboat industry never recovered.

Looking at the shallow twists and turns of the Red River, it’s hard to imagine that steam-powered paddlewheel boats were once the most important transportation link between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. From the first in 1859 to the last that sank in 1909, Red River steamboats hauled thousands of settlers and millions of tons of freight across the border between the United States and Canada. Although it lasted barely 50 years, the age of the steamboat forged a commercial network between the two countries that exists to this day in the Interstate-29 corridor.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Glenda Baker Embry (City Drivers)

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Glenda Baker Embry can tell that not everyone in Parshall, North Dakota, is originally from North Dakota because they look different and they speak differently. She also comments that small-town North Dakota drivers are getting hand gestures other than the neighborly waves they once got.

Faces of the Oil Patch | Julie Wisness

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Hear Julie Wisness, a rancher from Keene, North Dakota, explain that she and her husband decided to stay in this area because it is their home, but recognize that others in the area have complaints and have decided to leave due to all the changes. “Oil is great; if you have it, it’s wonderful.”

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