Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Professional (X) - Middle (X) - Reconstruction (X) - U.S. History (X)

Elizabeth Cady Stanton | Orator, Author, and Activist Video

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Powerful orator and author Elizabeth Cady Stanton, along with Susan B. Anthony, co-founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, an organization dedicated to obtaining equal rights for women. Stanton’s ideas about religion, divorce, and labor were radical for her time. By watching a short video and engaging in two primary source activities, students will explore the need for social change, as well as its inherent challenges.

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Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

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This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

George Washington Carver | Scientist, Inventor, and Teacher Video

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George Washington Carver was a world-renowned American botanist who devoted his life’s work to helping farmers successfully grow their crops. A lover of nature with a keen intellect and desire to help people better their lives, Carver used his knowledge to make American farms flourish, which helped the nation as a whole. By doing two primary source activities and watching a short video, students will explore the life of science and innovation led by George Washington Carver.

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Harriet Tubman | Abolition Activist Video

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In this lesson, students will learn about Harriet Tubman’s courage in the face of enormous risks. After watching a biographical video, students will examine a photograph of Tubman and read a letter written to her by Frederick Douglass. The lesson asks students to compare Harriet Tubman to modern-day women and girls who have similarly confronted great risks to help others.

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Sanford History | Central Florida Roadtrip

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Known as the "Historic Waterfront Gateway City," Sanford sits on the southern shore of Lake Monroe, a major port on the St. Johns River and has played a major role in helping shape Central and South Florida's history.

West Virginia History in 10 Seconds l State Capital

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Use this 10 second history lesson to trace the movements of the West Virginia state capital.

Sojourner Truth | Abolitionist and Women’s Rights Activist Video

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An abolitionist and feminist during the nineteenth century, Sojourner Truth demanded not less discrimination, but no discrimination. Truth escaped enslavement and, despite being unable to read or write, rose to be a leader in the fight for equality and fair treatment for both women and African Americans. Through two primary source activities and a short biographical video, students will understand the remarkable career of this persevering woman who lived up to her self-chosen name.

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Barber and Mizzell Feud - Kissimmee | Central Florida Roadtrip

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Most all of us have heard of the feud between the Hattfields and the McCoys. Well, what about the Mizell-Barber family feud. Bone Mizell was the cousin of David Mizell, who was the sheriff of Orange County back in 1870. Moses Barber was a successful cattleman. This family feud was fueled in large part by post-civil war politics.

Mark Twain | Storyteller, Novelist, and Humorist Video

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Mark Twain, often considered the “father of American literature,” was the first American writer to tell his stories in an emerging American vernacular--the speech of common folk. Based on his many adventures, Twain’s books reflect his witty observations about everyday life in nineteenth-century America. By examining two primary source activities and a short video, students will learn how this literary icon used humor and a uniquely American voice to chronicle post-Civil War life in the United States.

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Reconstruction and Black Education

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Before the Civil War, most southern states made it illegal to educate slaves, but many enslaved people did learn to read and write. During the post-Civil War Reconstruction era, the number of schools and the literacy rate for African Americans increased dramatically. This mini-documentary, produced for the American Experience: "Reconstruction" Web site, follows the development of schools for African Americans as well as the resistance it sparked.

Booker T. Washington | Orator, Teacher, and Advisor Video

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Freed from the bonds of slavery by the Emancipation Proclamation, Booker T. Washington worked relentlessly to become a teacher, an accomplished orator, and an advisor to two Presidents. He was considered a hero in the late 1800s, although some opposed his philosophy that equality and respect must be patiently earned. Through two primary source activities and watching a short video, students will learn about Booker T. Washington’s commitment to African American education, and assess his ideas about how to achieve equality for African Americans in the years after the Civil War.

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