Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Professional (X) - Science and Technology (X) - U.S. History (X) - World History (X)

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Individual Freedom

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Learn about the history of automobiles in North Dakota. The automobile age gave freedom of movement and choice for passengers and freight. With more people driving cars, the push came for better roads.

Rivers, Roads, Rails, and Air | Peerless Transportation

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Learn about the role of railroads in North Dakota history. In their time, railroads had no peer in their ability to move people and goods, although shipping costs were high. The railroad companies helped increase immigration to North Dakota by actively marketing the opportunities here to foreigners, especially Scandinavians and Germans from Russia.

Edison: Boyhood and Teen Years

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Find out how young Thomas Edison’s curiosity got him into trouble, and how, during his teen years, he lost his hearing but gained confidence as an aspiring inventor, in this video adapted from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Edison. As portrayed through reenactments, we learn that Edison, who had just three months of formal schooling, grew up reading and conducting chemistry experiments. His job as a newsboy on a train inspired his fascination with the telegraph. After teaching himself Morse Code so he could send and receive messages, Edison took a job as a telegraph operator at the age of 15. Through his work, and despite premature hearing loss, he developed an understanding of how the telegraph system operated and how he might improve it. He began to think of himself as an inventor. This resource is part of the Thomas Edison Collection.

Click on the links below to download a customizable Student Handout, Student Reading and transcript for this resource.

Student Handout | Student Reading | Transcript

J. Alden Loring

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Loring, a naturalist, mammologist and author, had worked for U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, the Smithsonian Institute, and the Bureau of Biological Survey. In 1909 he embarked on an expedition to Africa with President Theodore Roosevelt to collect specimens for a new Natural History Museum.

Alexander Graham Bell | Scientist, Inventor, and Teacher Video

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Alexander Graham Bell devoted his life to helping people—deaf and hearing—communicate. Working tirelessly to integrate the deaf into society—like his pupil Helen Keller—Bell was also an avid inventor. He created numerous communication devices, including the telephone. Using a short video and two primary sources, students will learn about Bell’s inventions and his work with the deaf community.

View the Lesson Plan.