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American Muslim Women | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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American Muslim women, who are comprised of immigrants from more than 60 nations as well as native-born Americans, are confronted by many stereotypes. In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, learn about Muslim women living in America and how they contend with the misconceptions about their faith and their status within it.

Somali Muslims in Maine | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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In recent years, more than 1,000 Somalis have moved to Lewiston, Maine. At first, Lewiston's mainly white, working class residents were accepting of their new neighbors, but as more and more Somalis streamed into the former mill town, tensions began to flare between longtime residents and the new immigrants. This video from  Religion & Ethics Newsweekly looks at this controversial migration and its impact on the community.

Ramadan Moon | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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For Muslims around the world, Ramadan is the holiest month in Islam, a time of prayer and daily fasting, as well as celebration. The start of Ramadan is signaled by the sighting of the crescent moon (hilal). This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly follows the process of sighting the new moon for Muslims in America.

Muslims in America | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Since September 11th, Muslims across the nation have faced numerous new challenges and opportunities as they continue to define their community in America. One of the key challenges has been differentiating themselves from terrorists in the eyes of the government and the public. This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly examines both the internal and external challenges facing American Muslims in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.

Exploring Religious America | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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This video profiles a small community in an Atlanta, Georgia suburb where religious tolerance is being put to the test. The video, from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, reports on what happened when Muslims in Lawrenceville, Georgia requested permission to create an Islamic cemetery on land they purchased that is located across the street from a Methodist church and cemetery. The Muslim group's willingness to compromise on some traditional burial practices in order to satisfy neighborhood objections illustrates the kinds of accommodations religious newcomers often must make in adjusting to new surroundings.

Muslim Diversity

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Roughly half of the Muslims in the United States are African American and the other half are immigrants and their American-born children. The Muslim American Society represents African American Muslims and the Islamic Society of North America represents Muslims who are mostly from Africa and Asia. This video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly examines the differences between the two groups and whether the two communities can bridge the cultural gap that divides them.

Hajj: Part III | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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In this video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, Anisa Mehdi, the first American reporter allowed inside Mecca to cover the pilgrimage, follows Abdul Alim Mubarak, a television editor from Maplewood, New Jersey, during his first trek to the sacred site and his return back home to the U.S. Learn about his impressions when he first saw the Ka'bah and how the journey has impacted his life.

Eid al-Fitr

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Eid al-Fitr is the Islamic celebration that marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, a time of fasting, spiritual renewal and reflection. This video segment from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly looks at Ramadan and how American Muslims observe it in a non-Muslim culture.

Islamic Celebrations | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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Muslims around the world end their month long observance of Ramadan with a celebration known as Eid Al-Fitr, the "Feast of Breaking the Fast." In this video from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, members of the Islamic Center of Washington, DC discuss the religious and spiritual significance of these annual religious events.

Hajj: Part I | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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One of the five requirements or pillars of Islam is the pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia, also known as the Hajj. The journey is taken by thousands of Americans each year. This video on the Hajj from Religion & Ethics Newsweekly begins with a look at one American Muslim preparing for his first trip to Mecca.

Jewish High Holidays | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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This video from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly shows Rabbi Alan Lew describing the spiritual transformation Jews experience by observing the High Holy Days. The Jewish High Holy Days are a 10-day period of prayer and penitence beginning with Rosh Hashanah, the Day of Awe, the Jewish New Year, and ending with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. During this sacred time of reflection and repentance, Jews around the world attend special services, gather with friends and families for ritual meals, and observe a day of fasting.

Talmud Study | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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This video from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly examines a worldwide Talmud study program called Daf Yomi, meaning "a page a day." Reading a page a day, it takes seven-and-a-half years to finish all 2,711 pages of the Talmud, which consists of centuries of rabbinic commentaries on Jewish law and the meaning of the Torah, the first five books of the Jewish Bible. The wisdom of the Talmud is relevant to the lives of those who study it today.

Restoring the Torah | Religion & Ethics Newsweekly

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This video from Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly follows Neal Yerman, a sofer, or scribe, in Cherry Hill, New Jersey as he works on a Torah recovered from the Polish town of Ostrof, where 9,000 Jews were killed by Nazis over three days in 1941. The Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, is considered the holiest object in Jewish life.