Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Fine Arts (X) - Middle (X) - Civics and Government (X) - U.S. History (X)

Scottsboro Boys Stamp | History Detectives

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THE DETECTIVE: Gwen Wright.

THE PLACE: Scottsboro, Alabama.

THE CASE: What is the connection between an inconspicuous black and white stamp purchased at an outdoor market and a landmark civil rights case? “Save the Scottsboro Boys” is printed on the stamp, above nine black faces behind prison bars and two arms prying the bars apart. One arm bears the tattoo “ILD.” On the bottom of the stamp is printed “one cent.” The Scottsboro Boys were falsely accused and convicted of raping two white girls in 1931 on a train near Scottsboro, Alabama. It took several appeals, two cases before the United States Supreme Court, and nearly two decades before all nine finally walked free. History Detectives delves into civil rights history and consults with a stamp expert to discover how a tiny penny stamp could make a difference in the young men’s courageous defense effort.

Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they uncover the history, art and architecture that define America’s living symbol of democracy and freedom, the Capitol Building.

Prairie Churches | Hope and Prayer

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Learn about the Viking Lutheran Church in Maddock, North Dakota. Dedicated in 1909 it was at that time the largest Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church between the Twin Cities and Seattle.

Prairie Churches | A Hammer and a Nail, A Shovel and a Pail

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Learn about Father Phillip Ruhe, self-taught architect, who was responsible for the building of over 40 churches, including the elaborate Ukrainian Catholic Church of the Immaculate Conception at Cooks Creek, Manitoba, built over 22 years by volunteer hand labor.

Civil Rights in the Classroom | Georgia Stories

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Art like "Freedom School" shows how far we have come, provoking the viewer with its images and symbols to ask questions about that time in history. Mabel Cochran describes the school she attended and how students made do with battered and worn textbooks handed down from white schools. She states that white people fought school integration because they knew education would change a person's world. "If you can't read or write, think or figure, than someone else will control you. Education will free you," she said. Today's schools are very different with many races and nationalities represented in classrooms.

Stop and Frisk: The High School Senior

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Students will learn about the controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy as well as how to effectively use infographics in this video and lesson from PBS NewsHour Extra.