Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - ELA (X) - Middle (X) - Civics and Government (X) - U.S. History (X)

Stop and Frisk: The High School Senior

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Students will learn about the controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy as well as how to effectively use infographics in this video and lesson from PBS NewsHour Extra. 

Santa Fe Study Guide: Have School Shootings Become Part of American Culture? | PBS NewsHour

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Watch the first video, Remembering the Santa Fe Shooting Victims, to learn about the eight students and two teachers who were killed in the school shooting at Santa Fe High School on May 18, 2018 near Houston, Texas. Next, read the Associated Press (AP) story about the circumstances surrounding the shooting and answer the discussion in support materials questions below.

Then, watch the second video, Texas School Shooting Days Before Graduation Draws Governor’s Call for New Gun Laws. Consider how the words spoken by student Paige Curry relate to those spoken in the aftermath of the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

May 22, 2018 video and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Shmuly Yanklowitz's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Shmuly Yanklowitz is an intellectual rabbinical student at New York City's Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School and a passionate activist. A Modern Orthodox Jew, he feels compelled to break boundaries, to resist becoming an old-style rabbi stuck within the walls of the synagogue.

Does Trump’s School Safety Plan Make Schools Safer? | PBS NewsHour

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On March 11, 2018, President Donald Trump shared his school safety plan, which includes arming teachers, expanding mental health, and improving the National Instant Criminal Background System. The plan does not endorse expanding background checks. Trump backpedaled on his support for raising the minimum age to buy assault weapons, and the proposed program is being criticized for not going far enough to address the problem of gun violence. Arming teachers could make schools less safe, given accuracy problems and the potential to draw more shooters to schools.

March 14, 2018 videos and resource materials from PBS NewsHour.

Bilai Ansari's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Bilal Ansari is an African American father of three and a student in the Islamic Chaplaincy Program at Hartford Seminary. He works tirelessly in the Connecticut prison system, where inmates often convert to Islam, but where he is also the victim of a hate crime perpetrated by some of his co-workers.

Rob Pene's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Rob Pene was born in American Samoa and came to the United States on a baseball scholarship. Unsuccessful in his major-league tryouts, he pursues his passion through an urban ministry. He also writes and performs Christian rap. The sudden death of his father challenges Pene’s commitment to his chosen path.

Steven Gamez's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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This film tells the story of Steven Gamez who is studying to become a Catholic Priest. Steven is a Tejano (Texan-Mexican), born and raised on San Antonio’s rough West Side. He dreams of returning to his neighborhood and serving the poor.

Tahera Ahmed's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Tahera Ahmad is an outspoken young woman from a traditional Pakistani-American family. She is a coach and mentor for Muslims in high school while studying to be an Islamic chaplain. A trip to Egypt takes her out into the world for the first time, where she reflects on being a leader.

Jeneen Robinson's Story | What's Your Calling? Film Module

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Jeneen Robinson is an African American single mother, as well as a newly ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. She balances the responsibilities of parenting, schoolwork, and creating an original preaching style.

Why Can't Anyone Agree on the Crime Rate? | Above the Noise

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The news media is chock-full of contradictory stories about crime in the United States. Are murders on the rise, or at remarkable lows? A skim of the headlines might not give you a clear answer. So why is there room for disagreement about what should be a very basic statistic? The answer isn’t really about the data itself, but how we slice and dice that data. It’s about how we determine trends, what we’re comparing, and sometimes, what answer we want to find. In this Above the Noise video, host Shirin Ghaffary looks into why the crime rate in America can be such a confusing, and often misleading, topic to read and write about.

West Virginia | Road to Statehood

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Explore the events leading to statehood for West Virginia. The five lesson plans provide a guided viewing graphic organizer, primary source documents, maps, and activities to engage students in the study of the presidential election of 1860, the issues of the time, and individuals who played a role in the movment.

Analyzing Primary Sources to Learn about the Past | Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum

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In this series of three mini-lessons, students will participate in a virtual visit to the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum where they’ll have the chance to analyze a variety of primary sources to learn about the character and leadership of President Gerald R. Ford, as well as the era in which he served.

Author Wes Moore Explores Where Two Lives Diverge

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One name, two starkly different lives - that's the real-life scenario at the heart of author Wes Moore's new book, which explores how his life diverged from that of another boy with the same name who grew up in the same inner city Baltimore neighborhood.

Olympics Spur Protests Against Russia

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Help students understand the human rights issues surrounding the Sochi Olympic Games with this PBS NewsHour video from February 5, 2014. With the start of the 2014 Winter Games only days away, the president of the International Olympic Committee insisted that all countries respect the neutral, apolitical nature of the competition. That statement comes in the wake of international furor over a recently adopted Russian law that bans so-called gay propaganda. For a unit with four lesson plans on this topic please click here.

Obama Gets Personal in Effort to Help Young Men of Color

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Use this PBS NewsHour video and teacher's guide from February 28, 2014 to engage students on the important topic of supporting young men of color.

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