Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - U.S. History (X) - Government (X)

Founding Fathers

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Your goal in Founding Fathers is to emerge from the Philadelphia Convention acknowledged by all as the true Father of the Constitution due to your outstanding contributions to the final document.

Grade Level: 
Middle
Content Area: 
Social Studies
Play Time: 
90 min.
Founding Fathers

Our Nation's Capitol

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Join student reporters as they uncover the history, art and architecture that define America’s living symbol of democracy and freedom, the Capitol Building.

The White House: Inside Story | Kid's State Dinner

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Learn about the official Kid's State Dinner, an event that brings children with healthy recipes from around the country together at the White House to meet the First Lady and the President of the United States. 

Looking for Lincoln | All Things Lincoln

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. visits the Lincoln Museum to see the iconic “stove pipe” hat firsthand. He then travels to Beverly Hills for a tour of the world’s largest private collection of Lincoln-related artifacts.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln, Attorney at Law

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In this video segment, from the PBS documentay Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin examine Lincoln's years as a "prairie" lawyer on the Illinois circuit, and discuss how they honed and polished Lincoln's confidence, sense of fairness, and social skills.

Welcome (中国欢迎您) from the First Lady

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Join First Lady Michelle Obama as she discusses her upcoming trip to China and invites students to follow her journey.

Great States | Montana Government

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Find out about the way in which the people of Montana are governed. Nearly 60,000 people live on seven federally recognized American Indian Reservations in Montana, governing their own independent territories within the state. The rest of Montana is governed by the state. Montana state government is structured like the Federal government, with three branches: executive, legislative and judicial.

Early American Political Party Development

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Political parties are a very large part of modern politics in the United States. It is hard to imagine US politics, or even how government would function in the US, without political parties. Yet, the Constitution does not mention political parties. In fact, the first two political parties in the US emerged over disputes concerning the ratification of the Constitution. These became known as the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists, or the Democratic-Republicans. The Federalists wanted a strong federal government; the Democratic-Republicans (Anti-Federalists) wanted a weak federal government. Since this early dispute, a great number of other disputes have resulted in the emergence of an equally great number of political parties that have sought to participate in government. Review the sources in the media gallery to learn about the early history of politics and political parties in the United States. Pay close attention to what these images and descriptions say about this early political disputes and parties. These images will help you complete the worksheet in the Support Materials.

Great States | Oregon

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A state on the edge of a continent, Oregon’s first inhabitants first arrived 15,000 years ago. But it wasn’t until 1805 that explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark established Fort Clatsop, paving the way for newcomers who would help shape the state of Oregon into what we know today. Learn how the unique geography, economy, and culture of Oregon earned the state its name—the Pacific Wonderland.

Great States | North Dakota

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Named for the Dakota Indians who lived there, the state of North Dakota at the edge of the Great Plains is home to wide open spaces, rough-hewn Badlands, and hearty people. 

Great States | Idaho Government

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Idaho's state government and tribal councils have two different ways of governing, each with their own structure and set of rules. Delve into the different government structures and the history of Idaho's path to statehood. 

Great States | Iowa Government

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Why was Iowa’s original Constitution replaced? And why did the State capital move three times? Learn about how Iowa grew as a State and how Iowa is governed today.

Great States | Oregon Government

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Today, there are nine federally recognized Indian Tribes in Oregon. Seven reside on reservations, governing their own independent territories to meet the needs of their communities. Learn about tribal governments and the state government of Oregon. 

Great States | North Dakota Government

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North Dakota’s state and tribal governments make sure that education, law enforcement, and environmental standards are enforced. Find out more about these governments and how they work.

The White House: Inside Story | 9-11 at the White House

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For the people that worked there, the White House was always the safest place to be. However, that changed on September 11, 2001. After the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, many suspected the White House was the next target. A big Congressional Picnic was canceled, and everyone was given ten minutes to evacuate. The leadership, minus President Bush, moved to the Presidential Emergency Operation Center, a bunker under the White House. However, Chief Usher Gary Walters and a few of his staff stayed behind at the White House to remove benches and a stage in order to ensure that President Bush could come back and address the American people from the Oval Office.

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