Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Science (X) - Elementary (X) - Physical Science (X)

Points of Origin

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This animation from KET illustrates how an origin is used for positive and negative measurement along a straight line and on a flat plane. It also shows how an origin, latitude, and longitude identify locations on Earth and explores how measuring temperature differs from measuring height or weight.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

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This video segment from Building Big highlights the Clifton Suspension Bridge, one of the earliest of its kind. Though it was completed in 1864, when pedestrians, animals, and horse-drawn carriages were its main forms of traffic, its iron chain-link cables and stone piers today carry four million cars and other vehicles a year.

Steamboat Jimmy

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Learn about James Rumsey, the first man to invent the steam powered boat, and the challenges he faced when he demonstrated it for a crowd of people.

Building Big | Arch Bridge

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The Romans were some of the most important innovators in structural design. Of their contributions, the arch and the bridges they built using an elegant shape stand out as the most creative and enduring. In this video segment adapted from Building Big, series host David Macaulay describes the forces and design features that give arches their strength.

Macro Concerns in a Nano World

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Nanotechnology is beginning to play a larger part in our lives. But environmental and health concerns about exposure to nanomaterials are mounting, sparking a growing debate about their possible regulation. This QUEST video produced by KQED, looks further into nanotechnology, as this rapidly expanding field begins to play a larger part in our lives.

Darfur Stoves

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In this video from KQED's QUEST, see how researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have engineered a more efficient wood-burning stove for the women in refugee camps in Darfur, Sudan. The stove is greatly reducing their need for firewood as well as reducing the threats against them.

Historical Document Research | History Detectives

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History Detective Tukufu Zuberi investigates a letter which indicates that thirty years before John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln, Booth’s father threatened to kill another sitting president, Andrew Jackson. The letter to Jackson reads, “You damn’d old scoundrel… …I will cut your throat whilst you are sleeping.” It’s signed “Junius Brutus Booth.” The writer insists Jackson pardon two men who were sentenced to death. Why did the fate of these two men enrage such fury? Was the Booth letter a hoax? Or does assassination run in the Booth blood?

Galileo on the Moon

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Galileo used thought experiments to test many assumptions, including the notion that heavy objects fall more quickly than lighter objects when they are dropped. Lacking access to either a vacuum chamber or a planetary body that has no atmosphere, he nevertheless correctly predicted that all falling objects would accelerate at the same rate in the absence of air resistance. In this video segment from NASA, astronaut David Scott demonstrates the correctness of Galileo's prediction.

Green Lights

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Learn how and why LED lights are used to create the displays in Oglebay Park's Festival of Lights.

Fishing for Data in the Radioactive Waters off Fukushima

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This PBS NewsHour video and educational resource from March 6, 2014 will help students understand the dangerous repercussions of the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. Hear the opinions from scientist and Japanese fishermen to learn about radioactivity levels in the water and fish.

Exploring Monticello

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Exploring Monticello takes students into Thomas Jefferson’s home, a virtual laboratory for all kinds of ideas. Thomas Jefferson is best known for authoring the Declaration of Independence and becoming the third President of the United States, but he also had a great love for innovations which made him one of America’s first great scientists. This field trip gives students the opportunity to experience scientific discovery within the context of history, and to consider the creative process inherent in making something new and innovative.