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Mark Catesby Explores New Worlds

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[00:29:37] Shorter edited version provided by the Catesby Commemorative Trust. In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

The Curious Mister Catesby

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(00:55:28) In 1712, English naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. After a seven-year stay, he returned to England with paintings of plants and animals he had studied. They sufficiently impressed other naturalists that in 1722 several Fellows of the Royal Society sponsored his return to North America. There Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches. Resources includes both volumes of the original book published in 1731. The books contain all his original art work of plant and wildlife specimens completed during his journeys.

The Adventures of Mark Catesby: Unknown Explorer of The New World

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[00:02:51] Overview of naturalist Mark Catesby (1683-1749) crossed the Atlantic to Virginia. Catesby cataloged the flora and fauna of the Carolinas and the Bahamas by gathering seeds and specimens, compiling notes, and making watercolor sketches.

Steamboat Jimmy

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Learn about James Rumsey, the first man to invent the steam powered boat, and the challenges he faced when he demonstrated it for a crowd of people.

Primitive Technology | Georgia Stories

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Primitive cultures living in Georgia thousands of years ago made everything they needed. Today it is important to the surviving native cultures to continue practicing the skills and sharing the traditions that ensured survival.

The Garden (Clip 3) | Exploring Monticello

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In this segment of Exploring Monticello, we learn about Jefferson's vast garden where he experimented with growing many different varieties of vegetables.

Exploring Monticello takes students into Thomas Jefferson’s home, a virtual laboratory for all kinds of ideas. Thomas Jefferson is best known for authoring the Declaration of Independence and becoming the third President of the United States, but he also had a great love for innovations which made him one of America’s first great scientists.  This LIVE interactive streaming field trip gives students the opportunity to experience scientific discovery within the context of history, and to consider the creative process inherent in making something new and innovative.

NOVA: Percy Julian: Forgotten Genius | Getting an Education

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Learn about the education of chemist Percy Julian. Julian's early educational years paralleled an educational movement that prepared African Americans for industrial jobs, the growing white supremacist movement, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. Julian would eventually move north, and finally to Europe to earn his Ph.D. Explore more about this topic, from the NOVA program Percy Julian: Forgotten Genius.

This video is available in both English and Spanish audio, along with corresponding closed captions.

NOVA: To The Moon | How Do You Get to the Moon?

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During the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the Moon. This video, adapted from NOVA, details the three competing mission plans considered for landing a manned spacecraft on the lunar surface and focuses on how the Moon's low-gravity conditions and lack of atmosphere influenced the design and manufacture of the landing craft.

Agriculture and Technology | Georgia Stories

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Technological inventions during the twentieth century have changed the way we work. Once, 30 acres was the most farm families could manage and that was with everyone pitching in. Today, farmers can work thousands of acres and produce more per acre than their grandfathers did. Metter farmer Bill Lanier tells about his experiences in the past saying he did not know he was poor because everyone was poor. According to Lanier, in the 1940s, a wife, mule, bed, and a stove were sufficient for earning a living on the land. Times have changed and the Department of Defense has played a role in improving farming. Dr. Craig Kvien, an agricultural scientist at the University of Georgia, explains how global positioning system technology (GPS) used in the Gulf War helps farmers.

Naval Stores | Georgia Stories

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What are naval stores? It is an unusual term and one not heard as much today as in Georgia’s past. It is not a place to buy a boat, although it sounds like it. Naval stores are byproducts from pine trees like pitch and tar, and they were used to seal wooden ships and keep them afloat. Kirk Johnston, a Charles Town Landing State Park reenactor, shows off the Adventure, a replica of a 17th century sailing vessel and describes how saltwater, wind, and sun took a toll on wooden ships.

Lessons | Ken Burns: The Dust Bowl

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With better weather, the suitcase farmers returned and the same process that caused the Dust Bowl started again in the 1940s. What lessons can we take from what happened in the Dust Bowl?

Grand Coulee Dam

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Explore how the conflict between industrialization and the preservation of natural resources played out in the creation of the Grand Coulee Dam in the 1930s in this video from AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. The project was initially seen as a way to provide electric power and irrigation and to spur recovery from the Great Depression. Only later were the environmental consequences to the land and the people living there recognized and, in the latter case, given compensation. This resource is part of the AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Collection.

215: Modern Georgia, Part III | Georgia Stories

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Technology has changed the way we do most things.

 

Segments: Agriculture and Technology; The Candy Cane Factory; The Computer Industry

General Charles "Chuck" Yeager

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Explore the career of General Charles "Chuck" Yeager, first man to fly faster than the speed of sound.

Hedy Lamarr | Securing Wireless Communications through Frequency Changes

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Discover Hedy Lamarr’s contributions as a woman in STEM in this media gallery from the American Masters film Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story. Learn how Lamarr invented frequency hopping, the basis of secure wireless communications. In the accompanying teaching tips, find more information about her struggle to be recognized for her inventive contributions. Lamarr’s efforts can inspire students to delve deeper into the history of women in STEM. Additional support materials are available, including discussion questions and an activity exploring frequency and electromagnetic radiation.

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