Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - WNET (X) - Reconstruction (X) - U.S. History (X)

Picturing America - Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Winslow Homer

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Learn about the Civil War through the art of Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Winslow Homer in this video from Picturing America on Screen.  Saint-Gaudens's Robert Shaw Memorial in Boston Common depicts a resonant, courageous act of the Civil War, in which the first regiment of African American soldiers recruited in the North for the Union Army fought a doomed battle on a South Carolina fortress.

The Winslow Homer image of a soldier returning to his farm after the Civil War in The Veteran in a New Field refers to both the desolation of war and the country’s hope for the future. While the farmer’s scythe called to mind the bloodiest battles fought—and lives lost—in fields of grain, the bountiful crop of golden wheat could also be seen as a Christian symbol of salvation.

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow | Who Was Jim Crow?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Prior to the Civil War, in the early part of the 19th century, a white performer created the dancing and singing simpleton character "Jim Crow." The character mocked black people while entertaining white audiences by playing on white bigotry and racism. Following the Civil War and Reconstruction, after four million blacks became free, a racial apartheid occurred in the United States. The name "Jim Crow" became synonymous with this period in American history.

The Gilded Age: Architecture for the Elite | Treasures of New York: "Stanford White"

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This series of videos from Treasures of New York: Stanford White presents the Gilded Age, an era of great wealth and remarkable architecture. Through video, discussion questions, and classroom activities, students explore how architecture, literature, and art reflect the issues and concerns of the time period, and how the era still resonates today.

Ben Hall of Sapelo Island

Icon: 
Streaming icon

This video segment from Egg: the arts show presents a glimpse of the last island-based Gullah/Geechee community located on Sapelo Island. The original Gullah/Geechee people were slaves. When slavery was abolished, the island was abandoned to the slaves. Ben Hall of the Sapelo Island Cultural and Revitalization Society speaks of his pride for the island and community. We learn the island is made up of some of the most valuable real estate in America, but its inhabitants have resisted the sort of development that has captured the other coastal islands off the shores of Georgia and South Carolina. For more about Sapelo Island, see "Ronald Johnson of Sapelo Island" and "Frankie Quimby of Sapelo Island."

The Fourteenth Amendment - Part I

Icon: 
Streaming icon

By the end of the Civil War, the Union victory over the Confederate states marked a dramatic change in American history with the abolition of slavery and new amendments written into the U.S. Constitution. Passed in 1868, the 14th Amendment gave Congress special powers to protect and enforce the rights of former slaves in Southern states that adopted the greatest resistance to the new set of liberties afforded African Americans through citizenship. In this first of two video segments from The Supreme Court, learn how the nine justices evolved in their decisions to interpret the 14th Amendment as the nation moved forward after the war. To learn more, see “The Fourteenth Amendment - Part II.”