Social Studies

Social Studies (X) - Middle (X) - WNET (X) - Civics and Government (X) - U.S. History (X)

Looking for Lincoln | All Things Lincoln

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. visits the Lincoln Museum to see the iconic “stove pipe” hat firsthand. He then travels to Beverly Hills for a tour of the world’s largest private collection of Lincoln-related artifacts.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln, Attorney at Law

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment, from the PBS documentay Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin examine Lincoln's years as a "prairie" lawyer on the Illinois circuit, and discuss how they honed and polished Lincoln's confidence, sense of fairness, and social skills.

Looking for Lincoln | Abraham Lincoln's Words

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment, from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln, Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr. cites several of Lincoln's most famous lines of oratory from different points in his political career, noting the "seemingly simple but profoundly eloquent language" he used "to express and ennoble his cause."

Looking for Lincoln | Was Lincoln a White Supremacist?

Icon: 
Streaming icon

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. deconstructs the traditional, legendary narrative of Abraham Lincoln in this segment from the PBS documentary Looking for Lincoln. Writer Lerone Bennett, Jr. recalls his disillusionment with "The Great Emancipator" who'd been his childhood hero, citing Lincoln's proposed "compromise" solution to slavery (which had involved the deportation of slaves to colonies in Panama and Liberia) and Lincoln's failure to contribute anything to the Abolitionist cause prior to the Civil War. Historian David Blight, however, reminds us that it is our own task to define "what is worth remembering" about Lincoln's story.

The Fourteenth Amendment - Part I

Icon: 
Streaming icon

By the end of the Civil War, the Union victory over the Confederate states marked a dramatic change in American history with the abolition of slavery and new amendments written into the U.S. Constitution. Passed in 1868, the 14th Amendment gave Congress special powers to protect and enforce the rights of former slaves in Southern states that adopted the greatest resistance to the new set of liberties afforded African Americans through citizenship. In this first of two video segments from The Supreme Court, learn how the nine justices evolved in their decisions to interpret the 14th Amendment as the nation moved forward after the war. To learn more, see “The Fourteenth Amendment - Part II.”

Pap Singleton: To Kansas!

Icon: 
Streaming icon

In this video segment, learn about Benjamin “Pap” Singleton, a former slave who in 1874 led a group of 300 African Americans--the first of many groups--out of the South to the state of Kansas in search of a better life. Singleton began his call for an exodus that year and in a few years time, migrating blacks built over 20 towns. Singleton and many of his followers found the civil and economic independence they were looking for in Kansas. But for many freedmen, the trip itself was too arduous and numerous individuals lost their lives along the journey.